Risk factors associated with neonatal hypothermia during cleaning of newborn infants in labour rooms

Cheah Fook Choe, Nem Yun Boo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cleaning newborn infants with coconut oil shortly after birth is a common practice in Malaysian labour rooms. This study aimed: (1) to determine whether this practice was associated with a significant decrease in the core temperature of infants; and (2) to identify significant risk factors associated with neonatal hypothermia. The core temperature of 227 randomly selected normal-term infants immediately before and after cleaning in labour rooms was measured with an infrared tympanic thermometer inserted into their left ears. Their mean post-cleaning body temperature (36.6°C, SD = 1.0) was significantly lower than their mean pre-cleaning temperature (37.1°C, SD = 1.0; p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that the risk factors significantly associated with pre-cleaning hypothermia (< 36.5°C) were: (1) not being placed under radiant warmer before cleaning p = 0.03); and (2) lower labour room temperature (p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis also showed that the risk factors significantly associated with post-cleaning hypothermia were: (1) lower labour room temperature (p < 0.001); (2) lower pre-cleaning body temperature (p < 0.001); and (3) longer duration of cleaning (p = 0.002). In conclusion, to prevent neonatal hypothermia, labour room temperature should be set at a higher level and cleaning infants in the labour room should be discouraged.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-50
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Tropical Pediatrics
Volume46
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2000

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Hypothermia
Newborn Infant
Temperature
Body Temperature
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Thermometers
Ear
Parturition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Risk factors associated with neonatal hypothermia during cleaning of newborn infants in labour rooms. / Fook Choe, Cheah; Boo, Nem Yun.

In: Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, Vol. 46, No. 1, 02.2000, p. 46-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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