Risk factors and outcome of dysphagia after an acute ischaemic stroke

Bin Basri Hamidon, I. Nabil, Raymond Azman Ali

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dysphagia occurs frequently after a stroke. It is a major problem as patients are at risk of malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia. We aimed to identify the risk factors for and outcome of dysphagia over the first one month after an acute ischaemic stroke. Patients with acute first-ever ischaemic stroke admitted to the medical ward of Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM) between July 2004 and December 2004 were prospectively examined. Observation was done using pre-defined criteria. Demographic data, risk factors, and type of stroke were recorded on admission. The assessment of dysphagia was made using standardized clinical methods. All patients were followed up for three months. One hundred and thirty four patients were recruited in the study. Fifty-five patients (41%) had dysphagia at presentation. This number was reduced to 29 (21.6%) patients at one month. Logistic regression analysis revealed that age of more than 75 years [OR 5.20 (95% CI 1.89 - 14.30)], diabetes mellitus [OR 2.91 (95% CI 1.07 - 7.91)] and MCA infarct [OR 2.48 (95% CI 1.01-6.14)] independently predicts the occurrence of dysphagia after an acute stroke. Dysphagia at presentation was found to be an independent predictor of mortality at one-month [OR 5.28 (95% CI 1.51-18.45)] post ischaemic infarct. Dysphagia occurred commonly in ischaemic stroke. Advance age, diabetes mellitus and large infarcts were independently associated with the presence of dysphagia. Early stroke mortality can be independently predicted by the presence of dysphagia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)553-557
Number of pages5
JournalMedical Journal of Malaysia
Volume61
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2006

Fingerprint

Deglutition Disorders
Stroke
Diabetes Mellitus
Aspiration Pneumonia
Mortality
Malaysia
Malnutrition
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Observation
Demography

Keywords

  • Death
  • Dysphagia
  • Risk factors
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Risk factors and outcome of dysphagia after an acute ischaemic stroke. / Hamidon, Bin Basri; Nabil, I.; Ali, Raymond Azman.

In: Medical Journal of Malaysia, Vol. 61, No. 5, 12.2006, p. 553-557.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3c0be373fd2c4a46bd44e893e5d52078,
title = "Risk factors and outcome of dysphagia after an acute ischaemic stroke",
abstract = "Dysphagia occurs frequently after a stroke. It is a major problem as patients are at risk of malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia. We aimed to identify the risk factors for and outcome of dysphagia over the first one month after an acute ischaemic stroke. Patients with acute first-ever ischaemic stroke admitted to the medical ward of Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM) between July 2004 and December 2004 were prospectively examined. Observation was done using pre-defined criteria. Demographic data, risk factors, and type of stroke were recorded on admission. The assessment of dysphagia was made using standardized clinical methods. All patients were followed up for three months. One hundred and thirty four patients were recruited in the study. Fifty-five patients (41{\%}) had dysphagia at presentation. This number was reduced to 29 (21.6{\%}) patients at one month. Logistic regression analysis revealed that age of more than 75 years [OR 5.20 (95{\%} CI 1.89 - 14.30)], diabetes mellitus [OR 2.91 (95{\%} CI 1.07 - 7.91)] and MCA infarct [OR 2.48 (95{\%} CI 1.01-6.14)] independently predicts the occurrence of dysphagia after an acute stroke. Dysphagia at presentation was found to be an independent predictor of mortality at one-month [OR 5.28 (95{\%} CI 1.51-18.45)] post ischaemic infarct. Dysphagia occurred commonly in ischaemic stroke. Advance age, diabetes mellitus and large infarcts were independently associated with the presence of dysphagia. Early stroke mortality can be independently predicted by the presence of dysphagia.",
keywords = "Death, Dysphagia, Risk factors, Stroke",
author = "Hamidon, {Bin Basri} and I. Nabil and Ali, {Raymond Azman}",
year = "2006",
month = "12",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "553--557",
journal = "Medical Journal of Malaysia",
issn = "0300-5283",
publisher = "Malaysian Medical Association",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk factors and outcome of dysphagia after an acute ischaemic stroke

AU - Hamidon, Bin Basri

AU - Nabil, I.

AU - Ali, Raymond Azman

PY - 2006/12

Y1 - 2006/12

N2 - Dysphagia occurs frequently after a stroke. It is a major problem as patients are at risk of malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia. We aimed to identify the risk factors for and outcome of dysphagia over the first one month after an acute ischaemic stroke. Patients with acute first-ever ischaemic stroke admitted to the medical ward of Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM) between July 2004 and December 2004 were prospectively examined. Observation was done using pre-defined criteria. Demographic data, risk factors, and type of stroke were recorded on admission. The assessment of dysphagia was made using standardized clinical methods. All patients were followed up for three months. One hundred and thirty four patients were recruited in the study. Fifty-five patients (41%) had dysphagia at presentation. This number was reduced to 29 (21.6%) patients at one month. Logistic regression analysis revealed that age of more than 75 years [OR 5.20 (95% CI 1.89 - 14.30)], diabetes mellitus [OR 2.91 (95% CI 1.07 - 7.91)] and MCA infarct [OR 2.48 (95% CI 1.01-6.14)] independently predicts the occurrence of dysphagia after an acute stroke. Dysphagia at presentation was found to be an independent predictor of mortality at one-month [OR 5.28 (95% CI 1.51-18.45)] post ischaemic infarct. Dysphagia occurred commonly in ischaemic stroke. Advance age, diabetes mellitus and large infarcts were independently associated with the presence of dysphagia. Early stroke mortality can be independently predicted by the presence of dysphagia.

AB - Dysphagia occurs frequently after a stroke. It is a major problem as patients are at risk of malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia. We aimed to identify the risk factors for and outcome of dysphagia over the first one month after an acute ischaemic stroke. Patients with acute first-ever ischaemic stroke admitted to the medical ward of Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM) between July 2004 and December 2004 were prospectively examined. Observation was done using pre-defined criteria. Demographic data, risk factors, and type of stroke were recorded on admission. The assessment of dysphagia was made using standardized clinical methods. All patients were followed up for three months. One hundred and thirty four patients were recruited in the study. Fifty-five patients (41%) had dysphagia at presentation. This number was reduced to 29 (21.6%) patients at one month. Logistic regression analysis revealed that age of more than 75 years [OR 5.20 (95% CI 1.89 - 14.30)], diabetes mellitus [OR 2.91 (95% CI 1.07 - 7.91)] and MCA infarct [OR 2.48 (95% CI 1.01-6.14)] independently predicts the occurrence of dysphagia after an acute stroke. Dysphagia at presentation was found to be an independent predictor of mortality at one-month [OR 5.28 (95% CI 1.51-18.45)] post ischaemic infarct. Dysphagia occurred commonly in ischaemic stroke. Advance age, diabetes mellitus and large infarcts were independently associated with the presence of dysphagia. Early stroke mortality can be independently predicted by the presence of dysphagia.

KW - Death

KW - Dysphagia

KW - Risk factors

KW - Stroke

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34147093174&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34147093174&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 61

SP - 553

EP - 557

JO - Medical Journal of Malaysia

JF - Medical Journal of Malaysia

SN - 0300-5283

IS - 5

ER -