Risk and protective factors for cigarette use in young adolescents in a school setting: What could be done better?

MyHeARTs group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Smoking among Malaysian adolescents remains a public health concern despite concerted efforts in tobacco control. The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence and determinants of current-smoking status in young adolescents. This cross sectional study used the first round of the Malaysian Health and Adolescents Research Team's prospective cohort study. It was conducted in three States of the Central and Northern regions of Peninsular Malaysia between March and May 2012. The study used the multistage stratified sampling design. A total of 1,342 adolescents of both sexes, aged 12-13 years, were sampled from randomly selected urban and rural national schools. Information on current smoking status and associated factors were collected by a self-administered, pre-tested, validated, structured questionnaire. Seven percent of the samples were current-smokers; the majority (62%) of them started smoking at the age of 11 years or below. The prevalence of current smoking was significantly higher in males (odds ratio [OR] = 2.37; 95% CI: 1.46, 3.84), those who were influenced by smoker friends (OR = 8.35; 95% CI: 4.90, 14.25), who were unaware of the health risks of smoking (OR =1.85; 95% CI: 1.02, 3.36) and who reported a lack of satisfaction about their overall life (OR =3.26; 95% CI: 1.73, 6.12). The study findings provide valuable information to strengthen the existing school-based smoking prevention program through integration of social competence and social influence curricula. The program should empower the young adolescents to refuse tobacco offers, to overcome social influences and to resist peer pressure to avoid starting smoking. Particular focuses to include mental health service to prevent both emotional and behavioural problems are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0129628
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Jun 2015

Fingerprint

Tobacco
cigarettes
Tobacco Products
Smoking
odds ratio
Health
Health risks
Public health
Curricula
Odds Ratio
Sampling
tobacco
behavior problems
mental health
curriculum
peers
cohort studies
cross-sectional studies
Malaysia
health services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Risk and protective factors for cigarette use in young adolescents in a school setting : What could be done better? / MyHeARTs group.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 6, e0129628, 11.06.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{75857aabffde455f9a04af28a730cddf,
title = "Risk and protective factors for cigarette use in young adolescents in a school setting: What could be done better?",
abstract = "Smoking among Malaysian adolescents remains a public health concern despite concerted efforts in tobacco control. The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence and determinants of current-smoking status in young adolescents. This cross sectional study used the first round of the Malaysian Health and Adolescents Research Team's prospective cohort study. It was conducted in three States of the Central and Northern regions of Peninsular Malaysia between March and May 2012. The study used the multistage stratified sampling design. A total of 1,342 adolescents of both sexes, aged 12-13 years, were sampled from randomly selected urban and rural national schools. Information on current smoking status and associated factors were collected by a self-administered, pre-tested, validated, structured questionnaire. Seven percent of the samples were current-smokers; the majority (62{\%}) of them started smoking at the age of 11 years or below. The prevalence of current smoking was significantly higher in males (odds ratio [OR] = 2.37; 95{\%} CI: 1.46, 3.84), those who were influenced by smoker friends (OR = 8.35; 95{\%} CI: 4.90, 14.25), who were unaware of the health risks of smoking (OR =1.85; 95{\%} CI: 1.02, 3.36) and who reported a lack of satisfaction about their overall life (OR =3.26; 95{\%} CI: 1.73, 6.12). The study findings provide valuable information to strengthen the existing school-based smoking prevention program through integration of social competence and social influence curricula. The program should empower the young adolescents to refuse tobacco offers, to overcome social influences and to resist peer pressure to avoid starting smoking. Particular focuses to include mental health service to prevent both emotional and behavioural problems are needed.",
author = "{MyHeARTs group} and M. Dahlui and Jahan, {N. K.} and Majid, {H. A.} and Jalaludin, {M. Y.} and L. Murray and M. Cantwell and Su, {T. T.} and N. Al-Sadat and Maizurah Omar and Mohamed, {Mohamad Haniki Nik} and Rosnah Sutan and Azmi, {Nahar Mohd}",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0129628",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk and protective factors for cigarette use in young adolescents in a school setting

T2 - What could be done better?

AU - MyHeARTs group

AU - Dahlui, M.

AU - Jahan, N. K.

AU - Majid, H. A.

AU - Jalaludin, M. Y.

AU - Murray, L.

AU - Cantwell, M.

AU - Su, T. T.

AU - Al-Sadat, N.

AU - Omar, Maizurah

AU - Mohamed, Mohamad Haniki Nik

AU - Sutan, Rosnah

AU - Azmi, Nahar Mohd

PY - 2015/6/11

Y1 - 2015/6/11

N2 - Smoking among Malaysian adolescents remains a public health concern despite concerted efforts in tobacco control. The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence and determinants of current-smoking status in young adolescents. This cross sectional study used the first round of the Malaysian Health and Adolescents Research Team's prospective cohort study. It was conducted in three States of the Central and Northern regions of Peninsular Malaysia between March and May 2012. The study used the multistage stratified sampling design. A total of 1,342 adolescents of both sexes, aged 12-13 years, were sampled from randomly selected urban and rural national schools. Information on current smoking status and associated factors were collected by a self-administered, pre-tested, validated, structured questionnaire. Seven percent of the samples were current-smokers; the majority (62%) of them started smoking at the age of 11 years or below. The prevalence of current smoking was significantly higher in males (odds ratio [OR] = 2.37; 95% CI: 1.46, 3.84), those who were influenced by smoker friends (OR = 8.35; 95% CI: 4.90, 14.25), who were unaware of the health risks of smoking (OR =1.85; 95% CI: 1.02, 3.36) and who reported a lack of satisfaction about their overall life (OR =3.26; 95% CI: 1.73, 6.12). The study findings provide valuable information to strengthen the existing school-based smoking prevention program through integration of social competence and social influence curricula. The program should empower the young adolescents to refuse tobacco offers, to overcome social influences and to resist peer pressure to avoid starting smoking. Particular focuses to include mental health service to prevent both emotional and behavioural problems are needed.

AB - Smoking among Malaysian adolescents remains a public health concern despite concerted efforts in tobacco control. The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence and determinants of current-smoking status in young adolescents. This cross sectional study used the first round of the Malaysian Health and Adolescents Research Team's prospective cohort study. It was conducted in three States of the Central and Northern regions of Peninsular Malaysia between March and May 2012. The study used the multistage stratified sampling design. A total of 1,342 adolescents of both sexes, aged 12-13 years, were sampled from randomly selected urban and rural national schools. Information on current smoking status and associated factors were collected by a self-administered, pre-tested, validated, structured questionnaire. Seven percent of the samples were current-smokers; the majority (62%) of them started smoking at the age of 11 years or below. The prevalence of current smoking was significantly higher in males (odds ratio [OR] = 2.37; 95% CI: 1.46, 3.84), those who were influenced by smoker friends (OR = 8.35; 95% CI: 4.90, 14.25), who were unaware of the health risks of smoking (OR =1.85; 95% CI: 1.02, 3.36) and who reported a lack of satisfaction about their overall life (OR =3.26; 95% CI: 1.73, 6.12). The study findings provide valuable information to strengthen the existing school-based smoking prevention program through integration of social competence and social influence curricula. The program should empower the young adolescents to refuse tobacco offers, to overcome social influences and to resist peer pressure to avoid starting smoking. Particular focuses to include mental health service to prevent both emotional and behavioural problems are needed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84936120489&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84936120489&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0129628

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0129628

M3 - Article

C2 - 26068668

AN - SCOPUS:84936120489

VL - 10

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 6

M1 - e0129628

ER -