Revealing the power of the natural red pigment lycopene

Kin Weng Kong, Hock Eng Khoo, K. Nagendra Prasad, Amin Ismail, Chin Ping Tan, Nor Fadilah Rajab

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

94 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

By-products derived from food processing are attractive source for their valuable bioactive components and color pigments. These by-products are useful for development as functional foods, nutraceuticals, food ingredients, additives, and also as cosmetic products. Lycopene is a bioactive red colored pigment naturally occurring in plants. Industrial by-products obtained from the plants are the good sources of lycopene. Interest in lycopene is increasing due to increasing evidence proving its preventive properties toward numerous diseases. In vitro, in vivo and ex vivo studies have demonstrated that lycopene-rich foods are inversely associated to diseases such as cancers, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and others. This paper also reviews the properties, absorption, transportation, and distribution of lycopene and its by-products in human body. The mechanism of action and interaction of lycopene with other bioactive compounds are also discussed, because these are the crucial features for beneficial role of lycopene. However, information on the effect of food processing on lycopene stability and availability was discussed for better understanding of its characteristics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)959-987
Number of pages29
JournalMolecules
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

Fingerprint

pigments
Pigments
activity (biology)
food
food processing
Byproducts
Food processing
Food Handling
human body
ingredients
availability
cancer
Food additives
color
Food Additives
Functional Food
Cosmetics
lycopene
products
Medical problems

Keywords

  • Antioxidant
  • By-product
  • Diseases
  • Lycopene
  • Properties

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

Kong, K. W., Khoo, H. E., Prasad, K. N., Ismail, A., Tan, C. P., & Rajab, N. F. (2010). Revealing the power of the natural red pigment lycopene. Molecules, 15(2), 959-987. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules15020959

Revealing the power of the natural red pigment lycopene. / Kong, Kin Weng; Khoo, Hock Eng; Prasad, K. Nagendra; Ismail, Amin; Tan, Chin Ping; Rajab, Nor Fadilah.

In: Molecules, Vol. 15, No. 2, 02.2010, p. 959-987.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kong, KW, Khoo, HE, Prasad, KN, Ismail, A, Tan, CP & Rajab, NF 2010, 'Revealing the power of the natural red pigment lycopene', Molecules, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 959-987. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules15020959
Kong, Kin Weng ; Khoo, Hock Eng ; Prasad, K. Nagendra ; Ismail, Amin ; Tan, Chin Ping ; Rajab, Nor Fadilah. / Revealing the power of the natural red pigment lycopene. In: Molecules. 2010 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 959-987.
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