Retrospective examination of selected outcomes of Medicines Use Review (MUR) services in New Zealand

Ernieda Md Hatah, June Tordoff, Stephen B. Duffull, Claire Cameron, Rhiannon Braund

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Poor adherence to medication can lead to suboptimal outcomes, and is reported to occur frequently. Pharmacists in some countries are funded to support the appropriate use of medications in patients and enhance medication adherence, by providing services such as Medicines Use Review (MUR). Objective: To describe and investigate factors that may influence patients' knowledge and perceptions of and adherence to medications as determined during MUR. Setting: Community pharmacies in a locality in New Zealand. Method: Following consent from five MUR service providers, records of patients' MUR consultations conducted between November 2007 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed for information on patients, services, and outcomes. Using multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression, factors that predicted the providers' score of the patients' medication knowledge, and the patients' score of their adherence to and perceptions of medications, were investigated. Main outcome measure patients' knowledge, perceptions and adherence scores. Results: A total of 353 MUR patients' records were evaluated. The median (IQR) age of patients was 73 (63-81) years. About 41.1 % of patients were Māori. A total of 204 (57.8 %) patients had two MUR consultations and only 53 (15 %) had four. The mean score of patients' knowledge, perceptions of, and adherence to medications were found to increase in each visit which suggests that adherence support by pharmacists might improve patients' outcomes. Females had higher medication knowledge scores than males (OR 3.09, 95 % CI 1.29-7.44). There was some evidence to suggest Māori had lower scores for knowledge of medications than non-Māori (OR 0.092, 95 % CI 0.02-0.36). In addition, longer duration in the program predicted better scores for medication knowledge, adherence and perceptions of medications. Conclusions: MUR was found to have the potential to improve the scores of patients' knowledge and perceptions of and adherence to medicines, and factors such as gender, ethnicity and longer duration in the services were found to predict these outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)503-512
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical Pharmacy
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

New Zealand
Medicine
Medication Adherence
Morus
Pharmacists
Bioelectric potentials
Patient Medication Knowledge
Referral and Consultation
Logistics
Pharmacies
Logistic Models
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Community pharmacy services
  • Medication adherence
  • Medication knowledge
  • Medication review
  • New Zealand
  • Pharmaceutical care services
  • Pharmacists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Pharmacology
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Retrospective examination of selected outcomes of Medicines Use Review (MUR) services in New Zealand. / Md Hatah, Ernieda; Tordoff, June; Duffull, Stephen B.; Cameron, Claire; Braund, Rhiannon.

In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, Vol. 36, No. 3, 2014, p. 503-512.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Md Hatah, Ernieda ; Tordoff, June ; Duffull, Stephen B. ; Cameron, Claire ; Braund, Rhiannon. / Retrospective examination of selected outcomes of Medicines Use Review (MUR) services in New Zealand. In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy. 2014 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 503-512.
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AB - Background: Poor adherence to medication can lead to suboptimal outcomes, and is reported to occur frequently. Pharmacists in some countries are funded to support the appropriate use of medications in patients and enhance medication adherence, by providing services such as Medicines Use Review (MUR). Objective: To describe and investigate factors that may influence patients' knowledge and perceptions of and adherence to medications as determined during MUR. Setting: Community pharmacies in a locality in New Zealand. Method: Following consent from five MUR service providers, records of patients' MUR consultations conducted between November 2007 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed for information on patients, services, and outcomes. Using multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression, factors that predicted the providers' score of the patients' medication knowledge, and the patients' score of their adherence to and perceptions of medications, were investigated. Main outcome measure patients' knowledge, perceptions and adherence scores. Results: A total of 353 MUR patients' records were evaluated. The median (IQR) age of patients was 73 (63-81) years. About 41.1 % of patients were Māori. A total of 204 (57.8 %) patients had two MUR consultations and only 53 (15 %) had four. The mean score of patients' knowledge, perceptions of, and adherence to medications were found to increase in each visit which suggests that adherence support by pharmacists might improve patients' outcomes. Females had higher medication knowledge scores than males (OR 3.09, 95 % CI 1.29-7.44). There was some evidence to suggest Māori had lower scores for knowledge of medications than non-Māori (OR 0.092, 95 % CI 0.02-0.36). In addition, longer duration in the program predicted better scores for medication knowledge, adherence and perceptions of medications. Conclusions: MUR was found to have the potential to improve the scores of patients' knowledge and perceptions of and adherence to medicines, and factors such as gender, ethnicity and longer duration in the services were found to predict these outcomes.

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