Response of community pharmacists to the presentation of back pain: A simulated patient study

Siew Siang Chua, Claire Devi Ramachandran, Thomas T. Paraidathathu

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    19 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: To assess the response of community pharmacists to the presentation of back pain. Method: The researcher posed as a customer to obtain medication for back pain for her grandfather, and the consultations were recorded in a pretested data collection form. Setting: The study was conducted in 100 randomly selected community pharmacies located within the Klang Valley in Malaysia. This includes Kuala Lumpur, the capital city of Malaysia and its surrounding suburban areas. Key findings: In 85% of the consultations, pharmacists asked at least one question before recommending a treatment. The patient's medical history was the most frequently asked question by the pharmacists (60%). In general, a median of only five counselling elements were addressed by the pharmacists out of 13 recommended. The most common element of counselling addressed was the route of administration (98%), followed by the frequency and dose to be taken (92% and 88%, respectively). None of the pharmacists asked the 'customer' whether she required any further information. The number of counselling elements addressed was significantly associated with the age of the pharmacist, duration of consultation and the types of medication recommended (P<0.05). Most of the pharmacists (88%) recommended at least an oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug or a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor for the treatment of acute back pain. Diclofenac was the most commonly recommended medication for back pain (55% of consultations), followed by meloxicam (15%). The cost of treatment for back pain ranged from RM2.00 to RM38.00 with a median of RM10.00. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the extent of information gathering and counselling varied among community pharmacists in Malaysia and that in general, this appeared to be suboptimal. Professional bodies such as the Malaysian Pharmaceutical Society should create awareness among pharmacists regarding their responsibility to counsel patients or their caregivers.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)171-178
    Number of pages8
    JournalInternational Journal of Pharmacy Practice
    Volume14
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006

    Fingerprint

    meloxicam
    Back Pain
    Pharmacists
    Diclofenac
    Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors
    Pharmaceutical Preparations
    Anti-Inflammatory Agents
    Counseling
    Malaysia
    Referral and Consultation
    Costs
    Pharmaceutical Societies
    Pharmacies
    Acute Pain
    Health Care Costs
    Caregivers
    Research Personnel
    Therapeutics

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pharmaceutical Science

    Cite this

    Response of community pharmacists to the presentation of back pain : A simulated patient study. / Chua, Siew Siang; Ramachandran, Claire Devi; Paraidathathu, Thomas T.

    In: International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, Vol. 14, No. 3, 09.2006, p. 171-178.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Chua, Siew Siang ; Ramachandran, Claire Devi ; Paraidathathu, Thomas T. / Response of community pharmacists to the presentation of back pain : A simulated patient study. In: International Journal of Pharmacy Practice. 2006 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 171-178.
    @article{97b9613abcf54ccd8c30867a2960aa65,
    title = "Response of community pharmacists to the presentation of back pain: A simulated patient study",
    abstract = "Objective: To assess the response of community pharmacists to the presentation of back pain. Method: The researcher posed as a customer to obtain medication for back pain for her grandfather, and the consultations were recorded in a pretested data collection form. Setting: The study was conducted in 100 randomly selected community pharmacies located within the Klang Valley in Malaysia. This includes Kuala Lumpur, the capital city of Malaysia and its surrounding suburban areas. Key findings: In 85{\%} of the consultations, pharmacists asked at least one question before recommending a treatment. The patient's medical history was the most frequently asked question by the pharmacists (60{\%}). In general, a median of only five counselling elements were addressed by the pharmacists out of 13 recommended. The most common element of counselling addressed was the route of administration (98{\%}), followed by the frequency and dose to be taken (92{\%} and 88{\%}, respectively). None of the pharmacists asked the 'customer' whether she required any further information. The number of counselling elements addressed was significantly associated with the age of the pharmacist, duration of consultation and the types of medication recommended (P<0.05). Most of the pharmacists (88{\%}) recommended at least an oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug or a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor for the treatment of acute back pain. Diclofenac was the most commonly recommended medication for back pain (55{\%} of consultations), followed by meloxicam (15{\%}). The cost of treatment for back pain ranged from RM2.00 to RM38.00 with a median of RM10.00. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the extent of information gathering and counselling varied among community pharmacists in Malaysia and that in general, this appeared to be suboptimal. Professional bodies such as the Malaysian Pharmaceutical Society should create awareness among pharmacists regarding their responsibility to counsel patients or their caregivers.",
    author = "Chua, {Siew Siang} and Ramachandran, {Claire Devi} and Paraidathathu, {Thomas T.}",
    year = "2006",
    month = "9",
    doi = "10.1211/ijpp.14.3.0003",
    language = "English",
    volume = "14",
    pages = "171--178",
    journal = "International Journal of Pharmacy Practice",
    issn = "0961-7671",
    publisher = "Pharmaceutical Press",
    number = "3",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Response of community pharmacists to the presentation of back pain

    T2 - A simulated patient study

    AU - Chua, Siew Siang

    AU - Ramachandran, Claire Devi

    AU - Paraidathathu, Thomas T.

    PY - 2006/9

    Y1 - 2006/9

    N2 - Objective: To assess the response of community pharmacists to the presentation of back pain. Method: The researcher posed as a customer to obtain medication for back pain for her grandfather, and the consultations were recorded in a pretested data collection form. Setting: The study was conducted in 100 randomly selected community pharmacies located within the Klang Valley in Malaysia. This includes Kuala Lumpur, the capital city of Malaysia and its surrounding suburban areas. Key findings: In 85% of the consultations, pharmacists asked at least one question before recommending a treatment. The patient's medical history was the most frequently asked question by the pharmacists (60%). In general, a median of only five counselling elements were addressed by the pharmacists out of 13 recommended. The most common element of counselling addressed was the route of administration (98%), followed by the frequency and dose to be taken (92% and 88%, respectively). None of the pharmacists asked the 'customer' whether she required any further information. The number of counselling elements addressed was significantly associated with the age of the pharmacist, duration of consultation and the types of medication recommended (P<0.05). Most of the pharmacists (88%) recommended at least an oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug or a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor for the treatment of acute back pain. Diclofenac was the most commonly recommended medication for back pain (55% of consultations), followed by meloxicam (15%). The cost of treatment for back pain ranged from RM2.00 to RM38.00 with a median of RM10.00. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the extent of information gathering and counselling varied among community pharmacists in Malaysia and that in general, this appeared to be suboptimal. Professional bodies such as the Malaysian Pharmaceutical Society should create awareness among pharmacists regarding their responsibility to counsel patients or their caregivers.

    AB - Objective: To assess the response of community pharmacists to the presentation of back pain. Method: The researcher posed as a customer to obtain medication for back pain for her grandfather, and the consultations were recorded in a pretested data collection form. Setting: The study was conducted in 100 randomly selected community pharmacies located within the Klang Valley in Malaysia. This includes Kuala Lumpur, the capital city of Malaysia and its surrounding suburban areas. Key findings: In 85% of the consultations, pharmacists asked at least one question before recommending a treatment. The patient's medical history was the most frequently asked question by the pharmacists (60%). In general, a median of only five counselling elements were addressed by the pharmacists out of 13 recommended. The most common element of counselling addressed was the route of administration (98%), followed by the frequency and dose to be taken (92% and 88%, respectively). None of the pharmacists asked the 'customer' whether she required any further information. The number of counselling elements addressed was significantly associated with the age of the pharmacist, duration of consultation and the types of medication recommended (P<0.05). Most of the pharmacists (88%) recommended at least an oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug or a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor for the treatment of acute back pain. Diclofenac was the most commonly recommended medication for back pain (55% of consultations), followed by meloxicam (15%). The cost of treatment for back pain ranged from RM2.00 to RM38.00 with a median of RM10.00. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the extent of information gathering and counselling varied among community pharmacists in Malaysia and that in general, this appeared to be suboptimal. Professional bodies such as the Malaysian Pharmaceutical Society should create awareness among pharmacists regarding their responsibility to counsel patients or their caregivers.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33748567104&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33748567104&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1211/ijpp.14.3.0003

    DO - 10.1211/ijpp.14.3.0003

    M3 - Article

    AN - SCOPUS:33748567104

    VL - 14

    SP - 171

    EP - 178

    JO - International Journal of Pharmacy Practice

    JF - International Journal of Pharmacy Practice

    SN - 0961-7671

    IS - 3

    ER -