Resistivity of carbon from oil palm bunches: Percolation theory

Mohamad Deraman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because they are cheap and available in very large quantities as a waste material from palm oil mills, oil palm empty fruit bunches can be seen as a potentially valuable starting material for manufacturing solid carbon products, which are widely used in the field of electrical engineering. In this context it was therefore important to study the electrical properties of carbon prepared from empty fruit bunches. The electrical resistivity of carbon pellets prepared from empty fruit bunch fibres at carbonization temperatures up to 1000 °C was measured and compared with predicted values derived from the granular model and percolation theory. The measured and predicted values were 7.75×10-2 and 8.57×10-2 Ω cm respectively. The small difference between these values seems to justify the supposition that at a carbonization temperature of 1000 °C the critical volume fraction and the constants ρ1 and t for carbon prepared from the endocarp of babasu coconut can be used in calculating the predicted values when the carbonization conditions used to prepare samples are nearly identical, even though empty fruit bunches and the endocarp of babasu coconut are obtained from different organs and plants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1060-1062
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Physics D: Applied Physics
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Palm oil
fruits
Fruits
carbonization
Carbonization
Carbon
oils
electrical resistivity
carbon
electrical engineering
Electrical engineering
pellets
organs
Volume fraction
Electric properties
manufacturing
electrical properties
Temperature
fibers
temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Resistivity of carbon from oil palm bunches : Percolation theory. / Deraman, Mohamad.

In: Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, Vol. 27, No. 5, 1994, p. 1060-1062.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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