Relative radiological risks derived from different tenorm wastes in Malaysia

B. Ismail, I. L. Teng, Y. Muhammad samudi

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In Malaysia technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) wastes are mainly the product of the oil and gas industry and mineral processing. Among these TENORM wastes are tin tailing, tin slag, gypsum and oil sludge. Mineral processing and oil and gas industries produce large volume of TENORM wastes that has become a radiological concern to the authorities. A study was carried out to assess the radiological risk related to workers working at these disposal sites and landfills as well as to the members of the public should these areas be developed for future land use. Radiological risk was assessed based on the magnitude of radiation hazard, effective dose rates and excess cancer risks. Effective dose rates and excess cancer risks were estimated using RESRAD 6.4 computer code. All data on the activity concentrations of NORM in wastes and sludges used in this study were obtained from the Atomic Energy Licensing Board, Malaysia, and they were collected over a period of between 5 and 10 y. Results obtained showed that there was a wide range in the total activity concentrations (TAC) of nuclides in the TENORM wastes. With the exception of tin slag and tin tailing-based TENORM wastes, all other TENORM wastes have TAC values comparable to that of Malaysia's soil. Occupational Effective Dose Rates estimated in all landfill areas were lower than the 20 mSv y. -1 permissible dose limit. The average Excess Cancer Risk Coefficient was estimated to be 2.77×10. -3 risk per mSv. The effective dose rates for residents living on gypsum and oil sludge-based TENORM wastes landfills were estimated to be lower than the permissible dose limit for members of the public, and was also comparable to that of the average Malaysia's ordinary soils. The average excess cancer risk coefficient was estimated to be 3.19×10. -3 risk per mSv. Results obtained suggest that gypsum and oil sludge-based TENORM wastes should be exempted from any radiological regulatory control and should be considered radiologically safe for future land use.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberncq577
    Pages (from-to)600-607
    Number of pages8
    JournalRadiation Protection Dosimetry
    Volume147
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2011

    Fingerprint

    Radioactive Waste
    Malaysia
    radioactive materials
    Tin
    sludge
    Sewage
    Waste Disposal Facilities
    Calcium Sulfate
    landfills
    oils
    dosage
    gypsum
    tin
    cancer
    Oils
    land use
    slags
    Neoplasms
    Soil
    soils

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
    • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
    • Radiation
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

    Cite this

    Relative radiological risks derived from different tenorm wastes in Malaysia. / Ismail, B.; Teng, I. L.; Muhammad samudi, Y.

    In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, Vol. 147, No. 4, ncq577, 11.2011, p. 600-607.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Ismail, B. ; Teng, I. L. ; Muhammad samudi, Y. / Relative radiological risks derived from different tenorm wastes in Malaysia. In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry. 2011 ; Vol. 147, No. 4. pp. 600-607.
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