Relationships observed between Trichoderma inoculation and characteristics of rice grown under System of Rice Intensification (SRI) vs. conventional methods of cultivation

Febri Doni, Che Radziah Che Mohd. Zain, Anizan Isahak, F. Fathurrahman, Norela Sulaiman, Norman Uphoff, Wan Mohtar Wan Yusoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The System of Rice Intensification (SRI), a management-based approach for improving rice production, has demonstrated various positive effects on rice plants’ growth, resilience and yield. These effects have been attributed in part to symbiotic interactions between rice plants and the microbes that live around, on and inside them; but research on this is still very limited. To examine such relationships, a multifunctional symbiotic fungus Trichoderma asperellum SL2 was evaluated to assess its effects, if any, on the germination and growth of young seedlings and then the subsequent performance of rice plants during their crop cycle. Greenhouse studies were conducted under gnotobiotic conditions to assess any effects associated with inoculating rice seeds with Trichoderma asperellum SL2 compared with uninoculated controls in terms of seedling establishment, an essential part of SRI methodology; and then assessing the capacity of this fungus to enhance the growth, physiological characteristics, nutrient uptake, and yield of rice plants growing under simulated SRI conditions. Results showed that the presence of Trichoderma asperellum SL2 in association with SRI cultural practices led to significant increases in rice seedling growth, germination rate, vigour index, and chlorophyll content, and elicited more favourable phenotypical responses from given genotype potential. The research observations further illustrated that for some parameters, there were no significant differences between inoculated and uninoculated SRI plants, both giving results superior to those for conventionally-grown plants even when inoculated. This indicated that SRI growing conditions are more favorable for Trichoderma to contribute towards the growth, physiological traits, nutrient uptake, and yield of plants, whereas conventional management methods diminish or inhibit these effects. Focused research remains to be done to establish how aerobic microbes such as Trichoderma can affect and accelerate the performance of rice plants being grown in SRI environments above and below ground.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalSymbiosis
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 8 Jul 2016

Fingerprint

Trichoderma
rice
Trichoderma asperellum
methodology
Seedlings
Growth
Oryza
Germination
nutrient uptake
Fungi
Research
Germ-Free Life
germination
microorganisms
fungi
seedlings
Chlorophyll
plant cultural practices

Keywords

  • Microbes
  • Rice
  • Symbiosis
  • System of Rice Intensification
  • Trichoderma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

@article{e4918ebeaae841dea85fd53a3eb2c91b,
title = "Relationships observed between Trichoderma inoculation and characteristics of rice grown under System of Rice Intensification (SRI) vs. conventional methods of cultivation",
abstract = "The System of Rice Intensification (SRI), a management-based approach for improving rice production, has demonstrated various positive effects on rice plants’ growth, resilience and yield. These effects have been attributed in part to symbiotic interactions between rice plants and the microbes that live around, on and inside them; but research on this is still very limited. To examine such relationships, a multifunctional symbiotic fungus Trichoderma asperellum SL2 was evaluated to assess its effects, if any, on the germination and growth of young seedlings and then the subsequent performance of rice plants during their crop cycle. Greenhouse studies were conducted under gnotobiotic conditions to assess any effects associated with inoculating rice seeds with Trichoderma asperellum SL2 compared with uninoculated controls in terms of seedling establishment, an essential part of SRI methodology; and then assessing the capacity of this fungus to enhance the growth, physiological characteristics, nutrient uptake, and yield of rice plants growing under simulated SRI conditions. Results showed that the presence of Trichoderma asperellum SL2 in association with SRI cultural practices led to significant increases in rice seedling growth, germination rate, vigour index, and chlorophyll content, and elicited more favourable phenotypical responses from given genotype potential. The research observations further illustrated that for some parameters, there were no significant differences between inoculated and uninoculated SRI plants, both giving results superior to those for conventionally-grown plants even when inoculated. This indicated that SRI growing conditions are more favorable for Trichoderma to contribute towards the growth, physiological traits, nutrient uptake, and yield of plants, whereas conventional management methods diminish or inhibit these effects. Focused research remains to be done to establish how aerobic microbes such as Trichoderma can affect and accelerate the performance of rice plants being grown in SRI environments above and below ground.",
keywords = "Microbes, Rice, Symbiosis, System of Rice Intensification, Trichoderma",
author = "Febri Doni and {Che Mohd. Zain}, {Che Radziah} and Anizan Isahak and F. Fathurrahman and Norela Sulaiman and Norman Uphoff and {Wan Yusoff}, {Wan Mohtar}",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
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doi = "10.1007/s13199-016-0438-3",
language = "English",
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journal = "Symbiosis",
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T1 - Relationships observed between Trichoderma inoculation and characteristics of rice grown under System of Rice Intensification (SRI) vs. conventional methods of cultivation

AU - Doni, Febri

AU - Che Mohd. Zain, Che Radziah

AU - Isahak, Anizan

AU - Fathurrahman, F.

AU - Sulaiman, Norela

AU - Uphoff, Norman

AU - Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar

PY - 2016/7/8

Y1 - 2016/7/8

N2 - The System of Rice Intensification (SRI), a management-based approach for improving rice production, has demonstrated various positive effects on rice plants’ growth, resilience and yield. These effects have been attributed in part to symbiotic interactions between rice plants and the microbes that live around, on and inside them; but research on this is still very limited. To examine such relationships, a multifunctional symbiotic fungus Trichoderma asperellum SL2 was evaluated to assess its effects, if any, on the germination and growth of young seedlings and then the subsequent performance of rice plants during their crop cycle. Greenhouse studies were conducted under gnotobiotic conditions to assess any effects associated with inoculating rice seeds with Trichoderma asperellum SL2 compared with uninoculated controls in terms of seedling establishment, an essential part of SRI methodology; and then assessing the capacity of this fungus to enhance the growth, physiological characteristics, nutrient uptake, and yield of rice plants growing under simulated SRI conditions. Results showed that the presence of Trichoderma asperellum SL2 in association with SRI cultural practices led to significant increases in rice seedling growth, germination rate, vigour index, and chlorophyll content, and elicited more favourable phenotypical responses from given genotype potential. The research observations further illustrated that for some parameters, there were no significant differences between inoculated and uninoculated SRI plants, both giving results superior to those for conventionally-grown plants even when inoculated. This indicated that SRI growing conditions are more favorable for Trichoderma to contribute towards the growth, physiological traits, nutrient uptake, and yield of plants, whereas conventional management methods diminish or inhibit these effects. Focused research remains to be done to establish how aerobic microbes such as Trichoderma can affect and accelerate the performance of rice plants being grown in SRI environments above and below ground.

AB - The System of Rice Intensification (SRI), a management-based approach for improving rice production, has demonstrated various positive effects on rice plants’ growth, resilience and yield. These effects have been attributed in part to symbiotic interactions between rice plants and the microbes that live around, on and inside them; but research on this is still very limited. To examine such relationships, a multifunctional symbiotic fungus Trichoderma asperellum SL2 was evaluated to assess its effects, if any, on the germination and growth of young seedlings and then the subsequent performance of rice plants during their crop cycle. Greenhouse studies were conducted under gnotobiotic conditions to assess any effects associated with inoculating rice seeds with Trichoderma asperellum SL2 compared with uninoculated controls in terms of seedling establishment, an essential part of SRI methodology; and then assessing the capacity of this fungus to enhance the growth, physiological characteristics, nutrient uptake, and yield of rice plants growing under simulated SRI conditions. Results showed that the presence of Trichoderma asperellum SL2 in association with SRI cultural practices led to significant increases in rice seedling growth, germination rate, vigour index, and chlorophyll content, and elicited more favourable phenotypical responses from given genotype potential. The research observations further illustrated that for some parameters, there were no significant differences between inoculated and uninoculated SRI plants, both giving results superior to those for conventionally-grown plants even when inoculated. This indicated that SRI growing conditions are more favorable for Trichoderma to contribute towards the growth, physiological traits, nutrient uptake, and yield of plants, whereas conventional management methods diminish or inhibit these effects. Focused research remains to be done to establish how aerobic microbes such as Trichoderma can affect and accelerate the performance of rice plants being grown in SRI environments above and below ground.

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