Relationships between antipsychotic medication and anthropometric measurements in patients with schizophrenia attending a psychiatric clinic in Malaysia

Omar Ainsah, R. Salmi, C. B. Osman, Shamsul Azhar Shah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the relationship between antipsychotic use and obesity among patients with schizophrenia. Participants and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. Patients who fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition) diagnosis of schizophrenia were included in this study. Demographic profiles and antipsychotic-related factors, including types of antipsychotic and concomitant drugs used, and duration of treatment, were obtained. Anthropometric measurements such as body mass index and waist circumference were measured and classified according to the body mass index and waist circumference classification for Asian populations proposed by the World Health Organization. Results: Sixty three (64.9%) and 34 (35.1%) patients were receiving atypical and conventional antipsychotics respectively. Twenty (20.6%) patients were being prescribed concomitant conventional depot antipsychotics. The prevalence of being overweight or obese (body mass index: > 23.0 kg/m2) was 71.4% (n = 45) for the atypical antipsychotics group and 79.4% (n = 27) for the conventional antipsychotics group. A large waist circumference was associated with treatment with atypical antipsychotics (p < 0.05) and concomitant conventional depot antipsychotics (p < 0.05). The duration of treatment with clozapine correlated inversely with patients' waist circumferences (r = -0.66, p = 0.04), and there was a positive correlation between duration of treatment and waist circumference in patients on olanzapine (r = 0.45, p = 0.03). Conclusion: Obesity is highly prevalent among patients with schizophrenia. A high waist circumference is related to the types of antipsychotic medications prescribed and concomitant use of conventional depot antipsychotics. These findings suggest schizophrenic patients are at higher risk of developing obesity-related physical illnesses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-27
Number of pages5
JournalHong Kong Journal of Psychiatry
Volume18
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008

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Malaysia
Antipsychotic Agents
Psychiatry
Schizophrenia
Waist Circumference
Body Mass Index
Obesity
olanzapine
Clozapine
Therapeutics
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography

Keywords

  • Anthropometry
  • Antipsychotic agents
  • Obesity
  • Schizophrenia
  • Weight gain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{e7c9065e38de4d37975d3e09d7d54fe3,
title = "Relationships between antipsychotic medication and anthropometric measurements in patients with schizophrenia attending a psychiatric clinic in Malaysia",
abstract = "Objectives: To examine the relationship between antipsychotic use and obesity among patients with schizophrenia. Participants and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. Patients who fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition) diagnosis of schizophrenia were included in this study. Demographic profiles and antipsychotic-related factors, including types of antipsychotic and concomitant drugs used, and duration of treatment, were obtained. Anthropometric measurements such as body mass index and waist circumference were measured and classified according to the body mass index and waist circumference classification for Asian populations proposed by the World Health Organization. Results: Sixty three (64.9{\%}) and 34 (35.1{\%}) patients were receiving atypical and conventional antipsychotics respectively. Twenty (20.6{\%}) patients were being prescribed concomitant conventional depot antipsychotics. The prevalence of being overweight or obese (body mass index: > 23.0 kg/m2) was 71.4{\%} (n = 45) for the atypical antipsychotics group and 79.4{\%} (n = 27) for the conventional antipsychotics group. A large waist circumference was associated with treatment with atypical antipsychotics (p < 0.05) and concomitant conventional depot antipsychotics (p < 0.05). The duration of treatment with clozapine correlated inversely with patients' waist circumferences (r = -0.66, p = 0.04), and there was a positive correlation between duration of treatment and waist circumference in patients on olanzapine (r = 0.45, p = 0.03). Conclusion: Obesity is highly prevalent among patients with schizophrenia. A high waist circumference is related to the types of antipsychotic medications prescribed and concomitant use of conventional depot antipsychotics. These findings suggest schizophrenic patients are at higher risk of developing obesity-related physical illnesses.",
keywords = "Anthropometry, Antipsychotic agents, Obesity, Schizophrenia, Weight gain",
author = "Omar Ainsah and R. Salmi and Osman, {C. B.} and Shah, {Shamsul Azhar}",
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AU - Ainsah, Omar

AU - Salmi, R.

AU - Osman, C. B.

AU - Shah, Shamsul Azhar

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N2 - Objectives: To examine the relationship between antipsychotic use and obesity among patients with schizophrenia. Participants and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. Patients who fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition) diagnosis of schizophrenia were included in this study. Demographic profiles and antipsychotic-related factors, including types of antipsychotic and concomitant drugs used, and duration of treatment, were obtained. Anthropometric measurements such as body mass index and waist circumference were measured and classified according to the body mass index and waist circumference classification for Asian populations proposed by the World Health Organization. Results: Sixty three (64.9%) and 34 (35.1%) patients were receiving atypical and conventional antipsychotics respectively. Twenty (20.6%) patients were being prescribed concomitant conventional depot antipsychotics. The prevalence of being overweight or obese (body mass index: > 23.0 kg/m2) was 71.4% (n = 45) for the atypical antipsychotics group and 79.4% (n = 27) for the conventional antipsychotics group. A large waist circumference was associated with treatment with atypical antipsychotics (p < 0.05) and concomitant conventional depot antipsychotics (p < 0.05). The duration of treatment with clozapine correlated inversely with patients' waist circumferences (r = -0.66, p = 0.04), and there was a positive correlation between duration of treatment and waist circumference in patients on olanzapine (r = 0.45, p = 0.03). Conclusion: Obesity is highly prevalent among patients with schizophrenia. A high waist circumference is related to the types of antipsychotic medications prescribed and concomitant use of conventional depot antipsychotics. These findings suggest schizophrenic patients are at higher risk of developing obesity-related physical illnesses.

AB - Objectives: To examine the relationship between antipsychotic use and obesity among patients with schizophrenia. Participants and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. Patients who fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition) diagnosis of schizophrenia were included in this study. Demographic profiles and antipsychotic-related factors, including types of antipsychotic and concomitant drugs used, and duration of treatment, were obtained. Anthropometric measurements such as body mass index and waist circumference were measured and classified according to the body mass index and waist circumference classification for Asian populations proposed by the World Health Organization. Results: Sixty three (64.9%) and 34 (35.1%) patients were receiving atypical and conventional antipsychotics respectively. Twenty (20.6%) patients were being prescribed concomitant conventional depot antipsychotics. The prevalence of being overweight or obese (body mass index: > 23.0 kg/m2) was 71.4% (n = 45) for the atypical antipsychotics group and 79.4% (n = 27) for the conventional antipsychotics group. A large waist circumference was associated with treatment with atypical antipsychotics (p < 0.05) and concomitant conventional depot antipsychotics (p < 0.05). The duration of treatment with clozapine correlated inversely with patients' waist circumferences (r = -0.66, p = 0.04), and there was a positive correlation between duration of treatment and waist circumference in patients on olanzapine (r = 0.45, p = 0.03). Conclusion: Obesity is highly prevalent among patients with schizophrenia. A high waist circumference is related to the types of antipsychotic medications prescribed and concomitant use of conventional depot antipsychotics. These findings suggest schizophrenic patients are at higher risk of developing obesity-related physical illnesses.

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