Reheated palm oil consumption and risk of atherosclerosis: Evidence at ultrastructural level

Tan Kai Xian, Noor Azzizah Omar, Low Wen Ying, Aniza Hamzah, Santhana Raj, Kamsiah Jaarin, Faizah Othman, Khin Pa Pa Hlaing @ Farida Hussan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Palm oil is commonly consumed in Asia. Repeatedly heating the oil is very common during food processing. Aim. This study is aimed to report on the risk of atherosclerosis due to the reheated oil consumption. Material and Methods. Twenty four male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into control, fresh-oil, 5 times heated-oil and 10 times heated-oil feeding groups. Heated palm oil was prepared by frying sweet potato at 180°C for 10 minutes. The ground standard rat chows were fortified with the heated oils and fed it to the rats for six months. Results. Tunica intima thickness in aorta was significantly increased in 10 times heated-oil feeding group (P<0.05), revealing a huge atherosclerotic plaque with central necrosis projecting into the vessel lumen. Repeatedly heated oil feeding groups also revealed atherosclerotic changes including mononuclear cells infiltration, thickened subendothelial layer, disrupted internal elastic lamina and smooth muscle cells fragmentation in tunica media of the aorta. Conclusion. The usage of repeated heated oil is the predisposing factor of atherosclerosis leading to cardiovascular diseases. It is advisable to avoid the consumption of repeatedly heated palm oil.

Original languageEnglish
Article number828170
JournalEvidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Atherosclerosis
Oils
Aorta
Tunica Intima
Tunica Media
Ipomoea batatas
palm oil
Food Handling
Atherosclerotic Plaques
Causality
Heating
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Sprague Dawley Rats
Necrosis
Cardiovascular Diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Xian, T. K., Omar, N. A., Ying, L. W., Hamzah, A., Raj, S., Jaarin, K., ... Pa Pa Hlaing @ Farida Hussan, K. (2012). Reheated palm oil consumption and risk of atherosclerosis: Evidence at ultrastructural level. Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2012, [828170]. https://doi.org/10.1155/2012/828170

Reheated palm oil consumption and risk of atherosclerosis : Evidence at ultrastructural level. / Xian, Tan Kai; Omar, Noor Azzizah; Ying, Low Wen; Hamzah, Aniza; Raj, Santhana; Jaarin, Kamsiah; Othman, Faizah; Pa Pa Hlaing @ Farida Hussan, Khin.

In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Vol. 2012, 828170, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Xian, TK, Omar, NA, Ying, LW, Hamzah, A, Raj, S, Jaarin, K, Othman, F & Pa Pa Hlaing @ Farida Hussan, K 2012, 'Reheated palm oil consumption and risk of atherosclerosis: Evidence at ultrastructural level', Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2012, 828170. https://doi.org/10.1155/2012/828170
Xian, Tan Kai ; Omar, Noor Azzizah ; Ying, Low Wen ; Hamzah, Aniza ; Raj, Santhana ; Jaarin, Kamsiah ; Othman, Faizah ; Pa Pa Hlaing @ Farida Hussan, Khin. / Reheated palm oil consumption and risk of atherosclerosis : Evidence at ultrastructural level. In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 2012.
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