Regulation of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the Pacific Rim: perspectives from the APRU Global Health Program

Chang Fu Wu, Alistair Woodward, Ya Ru Li, Haidong Kan, Rajasekhar Balasubramanian, Mohd Talib Latif, Mazrura Sahani, Tsun Jen Cheng, Chia Pin Chio, Nutta Taneepanichskul, Ho Kim, Chang Chuan Chan, Seung Muk Yi, Mellissa Withers, Jonathan Samet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While the development of evidence-based air quality standards for airborne particulate matter (PM) for Europe and North America is well-documented, the standard-setting processes in other regions are less well characterized. Many Pacific Rim economies suffer from severe and worsening air pollution. Particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) is associated with acute and chronic health effects and is a widely used air quality indicator. This paper reports on PM regulation in selected Pacific Rim economies, focusing on PM2.5, and provides recommendations on air quality regulation to economies without current standards Through workshops held by the Association of Pacific Rim Universities (APRU) Global Health Program, experts in air pollution from eight universities in eight Pacific Rim economies characterized current PM2.5 standards and monitoring in their economies, and then collaboratively created recommendations. A great diversity of air pollution exposures exists in the Pacific Rim. While some economies experience low levels of exposure, others have PM levels that are among the highest in the world. The health effects of air pollution are a concern everywhere, but few economies carry out in-depth, local impact assessments and comprehensive air quality monitoring to provide evidence for guidelines and standards. The development of regulations and policies addressing PM2.5 pollution is urgently needed in many Pacific Rim economies. The international literature provides a robust guide to local risks and should be used, in combination with country-specific population-directed air monitoring, to guide decisions on policies addressing this important global health problem.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalAir Quality, Atmosphere and Health
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 4 Aug 2017

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Particulate Matter
Air pollution
Air Pollution
particulate matter
Air
Air quality
Health
Monitoring
atmospheric pollution
Air quality standards
air quality
Medical problems
Policy Making
Aerodynamics
North America
Pollution
pollution exposure
Global Health
programme
regulation

Keywords

  • APRU Global Health Program
  • Pacific Rim
  • Particulate matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Regulation of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the Pacific Rim : perspectives from the APRU Global Health Program. / Wu, Chang Fu; Woodward, Alistair; Li, Ya Ru; Kan, Haidong; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Latif, Mohd Talib; Sahani, Mazrura; Cheng, Tsun Jen; Chio, Chia Pin; Taneepanichskul, Nutta; Kim, Ho; Chan, Chang Chuan; Yi, Seung Muk; Withers, Mellissa; Samet, Jonathan.

In: Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health, 04.08.2017, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, CF, Woodward, A, Li, YR, Kan, H, Balasubramanian, R, Latif, MT, Sahani, M, Cheng, TJ, Chio, CP, Taneepanichskul, N, Kim, H, Chan, CC, Yi, SM, Withers, M & Samet, J 2017, 'Regulation of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the Pacific Rim: perspectives from the APRU Global Health Program', Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health, pp. 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11869-017-0492-x
Wu, Chang Fu ; Woodward, Alistair ; Li, Ya Ru ; Kan, Haidong ; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar ; Latif, Mohd Talib ; Sahani, Mazrura ; Cheng, Tsun Jen ; Chio, Chia Pin ; Taneepanichskul, Nutta ; Kim, Ho ; Chan, Chang Chuan ; Yi, Seung Muk ; Withers, Mellissa ; Samet, Jonathan. / Regulation of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the Pacific Rim : perspectives from the APRU Global Health Program. In: Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health. 2017 ; pp. 1-11.
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