Regeneration of Degraded Lowland Dipterocarp Forest: Elephants as Seed Dispersal Agent

Siti Nurfaeiza Abd Razak, Wan Juliana Wan Ahmad, Nur Afiqah Izzati Noh, Nurul Alyaa Mohd Nasir, Aisah Md Shukor, Shukor Md Nor

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The pattern of forest structure changes is crucial to identify the leading ecological processes and future forest composition after disturbance. Hulu Terengganu, Malaysia was subjected to the development of a hydroelectric power plant. After the dam development, three forest habitat types were identified i.e. lowland dipterocarp remnants, secondary and isolated island forests. After one year, all trees were monitored in 39 units of 5 m × 5 m sample plots. In January 2017, forest edge had the highest number of individuals with 134 records from 36 families, 58 genera and 72 species compared to the ridge with 89 individuals (eight families, nine genera and 11 species) and islands recorded 59 individuals (nine families, 15 genera and 20 species). Forest edge also showed the highest density with 6700 ind./ha from 0.02 ha sample plots compared to the ridge (1780 ind./ha) in 0.05 ha and islands (1395 ind./ha) in 0.04 ha. Despite the difference in floral composition, these habitats had the same dominant species that of Macaranga tree species. In 2018, the number of plant individuals for all three habitats were slightly reduced. We suspected, elephants affected the regeneration processes. We recorded plants germinated from wild elephant dungs consisted of 32 species belonging to 15 families. Five species were considered as the most preferred plants by elephants. The regenerated tree species from our sample plots matched with the germinated seeds from the elephant dungs. In conclusion, forest regeneration at Hulu Terengganu was closely related with wildlife activities.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWater Resources Development and Management
PublisherSpringer
Pages438-446
Number of pages9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2020

Publication series

NameWater Resources Development and Management
ISSN (Print)1614-810X
ISSN (Electronic)2198-316X

Fingerprint

elephant
seed dispersal
Seed
regeneration
Hydroelectric power plants
Chemical analysis
Dams
forest edge
hydroelectric power plant
habitat
habitat type
dam
seed
disturbance
family

Keywords

  • Natural succession
  • Restoration
  • Wildlife corridor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment

Cite this

Razak, S. N. A., Ahmad, W. J. W., Noh, N. A. I., Nasir, N. A. M., Shukor, A. M., & Nor, S. M. (2020). Regeneration of Degraded Lowland Dipterocarp Forest: Elephants as Seed Dispersal Agent. In Water Resources Development and Management (pp. 438-446). (Water Resources Development and Management). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-1971-0_44

Regeneration of Degraded Lowland Dipterocarp Forest : Elephants as Seed Dispersal Agent. / Razak, Siti Nurfaeiza Abd; Ahmad, Wan Juliana Wan; Noh, Nur Afiqah Izzati; Nasir, Nurul Alyaa Mohd; Shukor, Aisah Md; Nor, Shukor Md.

Water Resources Development and Management. Springer, 2020. p. 438-446 (Water Resources Development and Management).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Razak, SNA, Ahmad, WJW, Noh, NAI, Nasir, NAM, Shukor, AM & Nor, SM 2020, Regeneration of Degraded Lowland Dipterocarp Forest: Elephants as Seed Dispersal Agent. in Water Resources Development and Management. Water Resources Development and Management, Springer, pp. 438-446. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-1971-0_44
Razak SNA, Ahmad WJW, Noh NAI, Nasir NAM, Shukor AM, Nor SM. Regeneration of Degraded Lowland Dipterocarp Forest: Elephants as Seed Dispersal Agent. In Water Resources Development and Management. Springer. 2020. p. 438-446. (Water Resources Development and Management). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-1971-0_44
Razak, Siti Nurfaeiza Abd ; Ahmad, Wan Juliana Wan ; Noh, Nur Afiqah Izzati ; Nasir, Nurul Alyaa Mohd ; Shukor, Aisah Md ; Nor, Shukor Md. / Regeneration of Degraded Lowland Dipterocarp Forest : Elephants as Seed Dispersal Agent. Water Resources Development and Management. Springer, 2020. pp. 438-446 (Water Resources Development and Management).
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