Recycled paper fibres as sound absorbing material

J. S T Sim, Rozli Zulkifli, M. F. Mat Tahir, J. S T Sim, R. Zulkifli, Mohd Faizal Mat Tahir, A. K. Elwaleed

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Noise pollution is a workplace hazard which causes loss of hearing, depending on the sound pressure level and duration of exposure. Because duration of exposure is usually uncontrollable, sound absorbers are used to reduce the value of sound pressure level. A common method to reduce noise is to use porous sound absorbers made out of mineral wools or glass fibres. However, these materials pose health risks and are non-recyclable. This project aimed to fabricate a sound absorber using recycled paper which is in the form of egg cartons as an alternative to the abovementioned fibres. Paper fibres posses high fibre porosity and can be manufactured in a manner which the properties can be easily controlled, making them ideal to be made into sound absorbers. Furthermore, they are biodegradable, do not pose health risks and can be manufactured into different shapes easily. Recycled paper was first turned into pulp, blended and poured into moulds. Different amounts of pulp was compressed until the sample size was approximately 20 mm thick and then dried in a furnace dryer at 60⁰C for 12 hours. The samples were tested using a two-microphone, transfer function impedance tubes according to the ISO 10534-2 standard. Its porosity was determined using a modified wash basin method. The results indicate that the optimum panel has an average noise reduction coefficient, (NRC) of 0.50, which qualifies it to be used as a sound absorbing material. It also encounters its maximum value of 0.98 which occurred at the 1575-1675 Hz range. When compared to other materials, recycled paper has similar properties as coir fibre and is quite comparable to other commercial sound absorbers at the same thickness.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationApplied Mechanics and Materials
PublisherTrans Tech Publications Ltd
Pages459-463
Number of pages5
Volume663
ISBN (Print)9783038352617
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event2nd International Conference on Recent Advances in Automotive Engineering and Mobility Research, ReCAR 2013 - Kuala Lumpur
Duration: 16 Dec 201318 Dec 2013

Publication series

NameApplied Mechanics and Materials
Volume663
ISSN (Print)16609336
ISSN (Electronic)16627482

Other

Other2nd International Conference on Recent Advances in Automotive Engineering and Mobility Research, ReCAR 2013
CityKuala Lumpur
Period16/12/1318/12/13

Fingerprint

Acoustic waves
Fibers
Health risks
Pulp
Porosity
Mineral wool
Noise pollution
Wool fibers
Audition
Microphones
Noise abatement
Acoustic noise
Glass fibers
Transfer functions
Hazards
Furnaces

Keywords

  • Impedance tube
  • Noise absorption coefficient
  • Porous layer
  • Recycled paper

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Sim, J. S. T., Zulkifli, R., Mat Tahir, M. F., Sim, J. S. T., Zulkifli, R., Mat Tahir, M. F., & Elwaleed, A. K. (2014). Recycled paper fibres as sound absorbing material. In Applied Mechanics and Materials (Vol. 663, pp. 459-463). (Applied Mechanics and Materials; Vol. 663). Trans Tech Publications Ltd. https://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMM.663.459

Recycled paper fibres as sound absorbing material. / Sim, J. S T; Zulkifli, Rozli; Mat Tahir, M. F.; Sim, J. S T; Zulkifli, R.; Mat Tahir, Mohd Faizal; Elwaleed, A. K.

Applied Mechanics and Materials. Vol. 663 Trans Tech Publications Ltd, 2014. p. 459-463 (Applied Mechanics and Materials; Vol. 663).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Sim, JST, Zulkifli, R, Mat Tahir, MF, Sim, JST, Zulkifli, R, Mat Tahir, MF & Elwaleed, AK 2014, Recycled paper fibres as sound absorbing material. in Applied Mechanics and Materials. vol. 663, Applied Mechanics and Materials, vol. 663, Trans Tech Publications Ltd, pp. 459-463, 2nd International Conference on Recent Advances in Automotive Engineering and Mobility Research, ReCAR 2013, Kuala Lumpur, 16/12/13. https://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMM.663.459
Sim JST, Zulkifli R, Mat Tahir MF, Sim JST, Zulkifli R, Mat Tahir MF et al. Recycled paper fibres as sound absorbing material. In Applied Mechanics and Materials. Vol. 663. Trans Tech Publications Ltd. 2014. p. 459-463. (Applied Mechanics and Materials). https://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMM.663.459
Sim, J. S T ; Zulkifli, Rozli ; Mat Tahir, M. F. ; Sim, J. S T ; Zulkifli, R. ; Mat Tahir, Mohd Faizal ; Elwaleed, A. K. / Recycled paper fibres as sound absorbing material. Applied Mechanics and Materials. Vol. 663 Trans Tech Publications Ltd, 2014. pp. 459-463 (Applied Mechanics and Materials).
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