Recycled palm oil is better than soy oil in maintaining bone properties in a menopausal syndrome model of ovariectomized rat

Ahmad Nazrun Shuid, Hong Chuan Loh, Norazlina Mohamed, Kamsiah Jaarin, Su Fong Yew, Ima Nirwana Soelaiman

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19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Palm oil is shown to have antioxidant, anticancer and cholesterol lowering effects. It is resistant to oxidation when heated compared to other frying oils such as soy oil. When a frying oil is heated repeatedly, it forms toxic degradation products, such as aldehydes which when consumed, may be absorbed into the systemic circulation. We have studied the effects of taking soy or palm oil that were mixed with rat chow on the bone histomorphometric parameters of ovariectomised rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into eight groups: (1) normal control group; (2) ovariectomised-control group; (3) ovariectomised and fresh soy oil; (4) ovariectomised and soy oil heated once; (5) ovariectomised and soy oil heated five times; (6) ovariectomised and fresh palm oil; (7) ovariectomised and palm oil heated once; (8) ovariectomised and palm oil heated five times. These oils were mixed with rat chow at weight ratio of 15:100 and were given to the rats daily for six months. Ovariectomy had caused negative effects on the bone histomorphometric parameters. Ingestion of both fresh and onceheated oils, were able to offer protections against the negative effects of ovariectomy, but these protections were lost when the oils were heated five times. Soy oil that was heated five times actually worsens the histomorphometric parameters of ovariectomised rats. Therefore, it may be better for postmenopausal who are at risk of osteoporosis to use palm oil as frying oil especially if they practice recycling of frying oils.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)393-402
Number of pages10
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume16
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2007

Fingerprint

Oils
Bone and Bones
Ovariectomy
palm oil
Control Groups
Poisons
Recycling
Aldehydes
Osteoporosis
Sprague Dawley Rats
Eating
Antioxidants
Cholesterol
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Bone histomorphometry
  • Heated frying oils
  • Ovariectomy
  • Palm oil
  • Vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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title = "Recycled palm oil is better than soy oil in maintaining bone properties in a menopausal syndrome model of ovariectomized rat",
abstract = "Palm oil is shown to have antioxidant, anticancer and cholesterol lowering effects. It is resistant to oxidation when heated compared to other frying oils such as soy oil. When a frying oil is heated repeatedly, it forms toxic degradation products, such as aldehydes which when consumed, may be absorbed into the systemic circulation. We have studied the effects of taking soy or palm oil that were mixed with rat chow on the bone histomorphometric parameters of ovariectomised rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into eight groups: (1) normal control group; (2) ovariectomised-control group; (3) ovariectomised and fresh soy oil; (4) ovariectomised and soy oil heated once; (5) ovariectomised and soy oil heated five times; (6) ovariectomised and fresh palm oil; (7) ovariectomised and palm oil heated once; (8) ovariectomised and palm oil heated five times. These oils were mixed with rat chow at weight ratio of 15:100 and were given to the rats daily for six months. Ovariectomy had caused negative effects on the bone histomorphometric parameters. Ingestion of both fresh and onceheated oils, were able to offer protections against the negative effects of ovariectomy, but these protections were lost when the oils were heated five times. Soy oil that was heated five times actually worsens the histomorphometric parameters of ovariectomised rats. Therefore, it may be better for postmenopausal who are at risk of osteoporosis to use palm oil as frying oil especially if they practice recycling of frying oils.",
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author = "Shuid, {Ahmad Nazrun} and Loh, {Hong Chuan} and Norazlina Mohamed and Kamsiah Jaarin and Yew, {Su Fong} and Soelaiman, {Ima Nirwana}",
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AU - Yew, Su Fong

AU - Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana

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