Recurrent intracranial haemorrhages in a patient with factor seven deficiency

A case report

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive hemorrhagic disorder. Clinical bleeding can vary widely and does not always correlate with the level of FVII coagulant activity measured in plasma. Most severe cases of factor VII (FVII) deficiency are diagnosed during childhood, often during the first 6 months of life. In infancy, the most common sites of bleeding occur in the gastrointestinal tract or CNS, accounting for 60-70% of bleeds in this age group. Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is one such agent, which has been shown to prevent hematoma expansion and improve outcome in acute intracranial haemorrhages. The purpose of this case report is to share our experience regarding the usefulness of rFVIIa in the management of acute intracranial haemorrhage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)261-263
Number of pages3
JournalMedical Journal of Malaysia
Volume66
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Factor VII Deficiency
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Hemorrhage
Hemorrhagic Disorders
Hematoma
Gastrointestinal Tract
Age Groups
recombinant FVIIa

Keywords

  • Inherited factor vii
  • Intracranial haemorrhage
  • Recombinant factor vii (rfvii)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Recurrent intracranial haemorrhages in a patient with factor seven deficiency : A case report. / Fadzil, Farizal.

In: Medical Journal of Malaysia, Vol. 66, No. 3, 08.2011, p. 261-263.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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