Reconciling proteomics with next generation sequencing

Low Teck Yew, Albert J.R. Heck

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Both genomics and proteomics technologies have matured in the last decade to a level where they are able to deliver system-wide data on the qualitative and quantitative abundance of their respective molecular entities, that is DNA/RNA and proteins. A next logical step is the collective use of these technologies, ideally gathering data on matching samples. The first large scale so-called proteogenomics studies are emerging, and display the benefits each of these layers of analysis has on the other layers to together generate more meaningful insight into the connection between the phenotype/physiology and genotype of the system under study. Here we review a selected number of these studies, highlighting what they can uniquely deliver. We also discuss the future potential and remaining challenges, from a somewhat proteome biased perspective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-20
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Chemical Biology
Volume30
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Proteomics
Technology
Physiology
Proteome
Genomics
Information Systems
Genotype
RNA
Phenotype
DNA
Proteins
Proteogenomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Reconciling proteomics with next generation sequencing. / Teck Yew, Low; Heck, Albert J.R.

In: Current Opinion in Chemical Biology, Vol. 30, 01.02.2016, p. 14-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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