RCL2, a potential formalin substitute for tissue fixation in routine pathological specimens

Noraidah Masir, Mahdiieh Ghoddoosi, Suhada Mansor, Faridah Abdul-Rahman, Chandramaya S. Florence, Nor Azlin Mohamed Ismail, Mohammad Rafaee Tamby, Nani Harlina Md. Latar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To investigate RCL2 as a fixative for tissue fixation in routine histopathological examination and to assess tissue suitability for ancillary investigations. Methods and results: Forty-nine samples from 36 fresh specimens were cut into three equal pieces and fixed in RCL2 diluted in 100% ethanol, RCL2 in 95% ethanol, or neutral buffered formalin as control. Suitability for microtomy, quality of histomorphology, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, fluorescent and silver in-situ hybridization analysis and extracted genomic DNA were assessed. Microtomy was straightforward in most tissue blocks, but there was difficulty in cutting in approximately a quarter of samples, which required careful handling by an experienced technician. There were no significant differences in tissue morphology between RCL2- and formalin-fixed tissues (P=0.08). Generally, the quality of histochemical staining, immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization were comparable to that of formalin-fixed tissues. Inconsistent immunoreactivity was noted, however, with antibodies against pan-cytokeratin and progesterone receptor. Genomic DNA concentration was higher in RCL2-fixed tissues. Using RCL2 diluted in 95% ethanol did not affect fixation quality. Conclusion: RCL2 is a potential formalin substitute suitable as a fixative for use in routine histopathological examination; however, difficulty in microtomy and occasional discrepancies in immunohistochemical reactivity require further optimization of the methodology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)804-815
Number of pages12
JournalHistopathology
Volume60
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012

Fingerprint

Tissue Fixation
Formaldehyde
Microtomy
Fixatives
Ethanol
Immunohistochemistry
DNA
Progesterone Receptors
Keratins
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Silver
In Situ Hybridization
Staining and Labeling
Antibodies

Keywords

  • Histopathological examination
  • RCL2
  • Tissue fixation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Histology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

RCL2, a potential formalin substitute for tissue fixation in routine pathological specimens. / Masir, Noraidah; Ghoddoosi, Mahdiieh; Mansor, Suhada; Abdul-Rahman, Faridah; Florence, Chandramaya S.; Mohamed Ismail, Nor Azlin; Tamby, Mohammad Rafaee; Md. Latar, Nani Harlina.

In: Histopathology, Vol. 60, No. 5, 04.2012, p. 804-815.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Masir, Noraidah ; Ghoddoosi, Mahdiieh ; Mansor, Suhada ; Abdul-Rahman, Faridah ; Florence, Chandramaya S. ; Mohamed Ismail, Nor Azlin ; Tamby, Mohammad Rafaee ; Md. Latar, Nani Harlina. / RCL2, a potential formalin substitute for tissue fixation in routine pathological specimens. In: Histopathology. 2012 ; Vol. 60, No. 5. pp. 804-815.
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