Randomized controlled trial of a good practice approach to treatment of childhood obesity in Malaysia

Malaysian Childhood Obesity Treatment Trial (MASCOT)

Sharifah W. Wafa, Ruzita Abd. Talib, Nur Hana Hamzaid, John H. McColl, Roslee Rajikan, Lai O. Ng, Ayiesah H. Ramli, John J. Reilly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context. Few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions for the treatment of childhood obesity have taken place outside the Western world. Aim. To test whether a good practice intervention for the treatment of childhood obesity would have a greater impact on weight status and other outcomes than a control condition in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Methods. Assessor-blinded RCT of a treatment intervention in 107 obese 7- to 11-year olds. The intervention was relatively low intensity (8 hours contact over 26 weeks, group based), aiming to change child sedentary behavior, physical activity, and diet using behavior change counselling. Outcomes were measured at baseline and six months after the start of the intervention. Primary outcome was BMI z-score, other outcomes were weight change, health-related quality of life (Peds QL), objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior (Actigraph accelerometry over 5 days). Results. The intervention had no significant effect on BMI z score relative to control. Weight gain was reduced significantly in the intervention group compared to the control group (+1.5 kg vs. +3.5 kg, respectively, t-test p < 0.01). Changes in health-related quality of life and objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior favored the intervention group. Conclusions. Treatment was associated with reduced rate of weight gain, and improvements in physical activity and quality of life. More substantial benefits may require longer term and more intensive interventions which aim for more substantive lifestyle changes.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Obesity
Volume6
Issue number2 -2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2011

Fingerprint

Pediatric Obesity
Malaysia
Randomized Controlled Trials
Quality of Life
Weight Gain
Accelerometry
Weights and Measures
Western World
Child Behavior
Life Style
Counseling
Diet
Control Groups

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Children
  • Obesity
  • Overweight
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Randomized controlled trial of a good practice approach to treatment of childhood obesity in Malaysia : Malaysian Childhood Obesity Treatment Trial (MASCOT). / Wafa, Sharifah W.; Abd. Talib, Ruzita; Hamzaid, Nur Hana; McColl, John H.; Rajikan, Roslee; Ng, Lai O.; Ramli, Ayiesah H.; Reilly, John J.

In: International Journal of Pediatric Obesity, Vol. 6, No. 2 -2, 06.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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