Quantitative assessment of source contributions to PM2.5 on the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia to determine the burden of Indonesian peatland fire

Yusuke Fujii, Susumu Tohno, Norhaniza Amil, Mohd Talib Latif

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Almost every dry season, peatland fires occur in Sumatra and Kalimantan Inlands. Dense smoke haze from Indonesian peatland fires (IPFs) causes impacts on health, visibility, transport and regional climate in Southeast Asian countries such as Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. Quantitative knowledge of IPF source contribution to ambient aerosols in Southeast Asia (SEA) is so useful to make appropriate suggestions to policy makers to mitigate IPF-induced haze pollution. However, its quantitative contribution to ambient aerosols in SEA remains unclarified. In this study, the source contributions to PM2.5 were determined by the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model with annual comprehensive observation data at Petaling Jaya on the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia, which is downwind of the IPF areas in Sumatra Island, during the dry (southwest monsoon: June–September) season. The average PM2.5 mass concentration during the whole sampling periods (Aug 2011–Jul 2012) based on the PMF and chemical mass closure models was determined as 20–21 μg m−3. Throughout the sampling periods, IPF contributed (on average) 6.1–7.0 μg m−3 to the PM2.5, or ∼30% of the retrieved PM2.5 concentration. In particular, the PM2.5 was dominantly sourced from IPF during the southwest monsoon season (51–55% of the total PM2.5 concentration on average). Thus, reducing the IPF burden in the PM2.5 levels would drastically improve the air quality (especially during the southwest monsoon season) around the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-117
Number of pages7
JournalAtmospheric Environment
Volume171
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

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peatland
coast
monsoon
haze
aerosol
matrix
sampling
smoke
regional climate
visibility
dry season
air quality
pollution

Keywords

  • Biomass burning
  • Malaysia
  • Peatland fire
  • PM
  • PMF
  • Source apportionment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

Quantitative assessment of source contributions to PM2.5 on the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia to determine the burden of Indonesian peatland fire. / Fujii, Yusuke; Tohno, Susumu; Amil, Norhaniza; Latif, Mohd Talib.

In: Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 171, 01.12.2017, p. 111-117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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