QCM-D and XPS study of protein adsorption on plasma polymers with sulfonate and phosphonate surface groups

Kim Shyong Siow, Leanne Britcher, Sunil Kumar, Hans J. Griesser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As some proteins are known to interact with sulfated and phosphated biomolecules such as specific glycosaminoglycans, this study derives from the hypothesis that sulfonate and phosphonate groups on solid polymer surfaces might cause specific interfacial interactions. Such surfaces were prepared by plasma polymerization of heptylamine (HA) and subsequent grafting of sulfonate or phosphonate groups via Michael-type addition of vinylic compounds. Adsorption of the proteins fibrinogen, albumin (HSA) and lysozyme on these functionalised plasma polymer surfaces was studied by XPS and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). It was also studied whether pre-adsorption with HSA would lead to a passivated surface against further adsorption of other proteins. XPS confirmed grafting of vinyl sulfonate and vinyl phosphonate onto the amine surface and showed that the proteins adsorbed to saturation at between 1 and 2 h. QCM-D showed rapid and irreversible adsorption of albumin on all three surfaces, while lysozyme could be desorbed with PBS to substantial extents from the sulfonated and phosphonated surfaces but not from the amine surface. Fibrinogen showed rapid initial adsorption followed by slower additional mass gain over hours. Passivation with albumin led to small and largely reversible subsequent adsorption of lysozyme, whereas with fibrinogen partial displacement yielded a mixed layer, regardless of the surface chemistry. Thus, protein adsorption onto these sulfonated and phosphonated surfaces is complex, and not dominated by electrostatic charge effects.

LanguageEnglish
Pages447-453
Number of pages7
JournalColloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces
Volume173
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Quartz Crystal Microbalance Techniques
Plasma polymerization
Organophosphonates
Quartz
Quartz crystal microbalances
sulfonates
Surface chemistry
quartz crystals
microbalances
Adsorption
Electrostatics
Polymers
dissipation
X ray photoelectron spectroscopy
Aging of materials
proteins
Proteins
Plasmas
adsorption
polymers

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Biomaterial interfaces
  • Heptylamine plasma polymers
  • Michael-type addition
  • Phosphonate
  • Protein adsorption
  • Quartz crystal microbalance
  • Sulfonate
  • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

QCM-D and XPS study of protein adsorption on plasma polymers with sulfonate and phosphonate surface groups. / Siow, Kim Shyong; Britcher, Leanne; Kumar, Sunil; Griesser, Hans J.

In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, Vol. 173, 01.01.2019, p. 447-453.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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