Psychosocial stressors at work and well-being of male employees

I. Z.A. Noor Dalila, Rosnah Ismail, Noor Hassim Ismail

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Psychosocial stressors appear to alter the state of mind and adoption of overeating behaviour, resulting in high body mass index. This study was conducted to determine the magnitude of psychosocial stressors on male employees' well-being. METHOD: This study used secondary data retrieved from a cross-sectional study involving 492 male employees' completed data. Eligible participants completed validated questionnaires of the Psychosocial Safety Climate (PSC-12) scale, short version Demand Induced Strain Compensation (DISQ 2.1), Oldenburg Burnout Inventory - Emotional Exhaustion domain and the Three Eating Factor Questionnaire (TEFQ) -Uncontrolled Eating domain; assessing psychosocial safety climate, job demands and job resources, emotional exhaustion, and uncontrolled eating behaviour, respectively. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated based on weight and height. The research statistical model was tested by two-steps of assessment replicating partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM). RESULT: The results show that psychosocial stressors (psychosocial safety climate, job demands and job resources) had significant effects on emotional exhaustion (β= -0.149, p=0.004; β= 0.223, p<0.001; β= -0.127, p=0.013). Emotional exhaustion predicted by work stressors may act as a chain reaction which could result in uncontrolled eating (β=0.138, p=0.005) and high BMI (β=0.185, p<0.001). Emotional exhaustion does mediate the relationship between PSC and uncontrolled eating behaviour (β= -0.021 [95% boot CI bias corrected: -0.048, -0.002]). CONCLUSION: The psychosocial stressors at work are significant factors for emotional exhaustion, which further signifies the positive effect on uncontrolled eating behaviour and BMI among Malaysian male employees.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)160-167
Number of pages8
JournalThe Medical journal of Malaysia
Volume74
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2019

Fingerprint

Body Mass Index
Feeding Behavior
Climate
Eating
Safety
Hyperphagia
Statistical Models
Least-Squares Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Weights and Measures
Equipment and Supplies
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Psychosocial stressors at work and well-being of male employees. / Noor Dalila, I. Z.A.; Ismail, Rosnah; Ismail, Noor Hassim.

In: The Medical journal of Malaysia, Vol. 74, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. 160-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{959480334e494215b51438bf50aeebe9,
title = "Psychosocial stressors at work and well-being of male employees",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Psychosocial stressors appear to alter the state of mind and adoption of overeating behaviour, resulting in high body mass index. This study was conducted to determine the magnitude of psychosocial stressors on male employees' well-being. METHOD: This study used secondary data retrieved from a cross-sectional study involving 492 male employees' completed data. Eligible participants completed validated questionnaires of the Psychosocial Safety Climate (PSC-12) scale, short version Demand Induced Strain Compensation (DISQ 2.1), Oldenburg Burnout Inventory - Emotional Exhaustion domain and the Three Eating Factor Questionnaire (TEFQ) -Uncontrolled Eating domain; assessing psychosocial safety climate, job demands and job resources, emotional exhaustion, and uncontrolled eating behaviour, respectively. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated based on weight and height. The research statistical model was tested by two-steps of assessment replicating partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM). RESULT: The results show that psychosocial stressors (psychosocial safety climate, job demands and job resources) had significant effects on emotional exhaustion (β= -0.149, p=0.004; β= 0.223, p<0.001; β= -0.127, p=0.013). Emotional exhaustion predicted by work stressors may act as a chain reaction which could result in uncontrolled eating (β=0.138, p=0.005) and high BMI (β=0.185, p<0.001). Emotional exhaustion does mediate the relationship between PSC and uncontrolled eating behaviour (β= -0.021 [95{\%} boot CI bias corrected: -0.048, -0.002]). CONCLUSION: The psychosocial stressors at work are significant factors for emotional exhaustion, which further signifies the positive effect on uncontrolled eating behaviour and BMI among Malaysian male employees.",
author = "{Noor Dalila}, {I. Z.A.} and Rosnah Ismail and Ismail, {Noor Hassim}",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "160--167",
journal = "Medical Journal of Malaysia",
issn = "0300-5283",
publisher = "Malaysian Medical Association",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Psychosocial stressors at work and well-being of male employees

AU - Noor Dalila, I. Z.A.

AU - Ismail, Rosnah

AU - Ismail, Noor Hassim

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - INTRODUCTION: Psychosocial stressors appear to alter the state of mind and adoption of overeating behaviour, resulting in high body mass index. This study was conducted to determine the magnitude of psychosocial stressors on male employees' well-being. METHOD: This study used secondary data retrieved from a cross-sectional study involving 492 male employees' completed data. Eligible participants completed validated questionnaires of the Psychosocial Safety Climate (PSC-12) scale, short version Demand Induced Strain Compensation (DISQ 2.1), Oldenburg Burnout Inventory - Emotional Exhaustion domain and the Three Eating Factor Questionnaire (TEFQ) -Uncontrolled Eating domain; assessing psychosocial safety climate, job demands and job resources, emotional exhaustion, and uncontrolled eating behaviour, respectively. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated based on weight and height. The research statistical model was tested by two-steps of assessment replicating partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM). RESULT: The results show that psychosocial stressors (psychosocial safety climate, job demands and job resources) had significant effects on emotional exhaustion (β= -0.149, p=0.004; β= 0.223, p<0.001; β= -0.127, p=0.013). Emotional exhaustion predicted by work stressors may act as a chain reaction which could result in uncontrolled eating (β=0.138, p=0.005) and high BMI (β=0.185, p<0.001). Emotional exhaustion does mediate the relationship between PSC and uncontrolled eating behaviour (β= -0.021 [95% boot CI bias corrected: -0.048, -0.002]). CONCLUSION: The psychosocial stressors at work are significant factors for emotional exhaustion, which further signifies the positive effect on uncontrolled eating behaviour and BMI among Malaysian male employees.

AB - INTRODUCTION: Psychosocial stressors appear to alter the state of mind and adoption of overeating behaviour, resulting in high body mass index. This study was conducted to determine the magnitude of psychosocial stressors on male employees' well-being. METHOD: This study used secondary data retrieved from a cross-sectional study involving 492 male employees' completed data. Eligible participants completed validated questionnaires of the Psychosocial Safety Climate (PSC-12) scale, short version Demand Induced Strain Compensation (DISQ 2.1), Oldenburg Burnout Inventory - Emotional Exhaustion domain and the Three Eating Factor Questionnaire (TEFQ) -Uncontrolled Eating domain; assessing psychosocial safety climate, job demands and job resources, emotional exhaustion, and uncontrolled eating behaviour, respectively. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated based on weight and height. The research statistical model was tested by two-steps of assessment replicating partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM). RESULT: The results show that psychosocial stressors (psychosocial safety climate, job demands and job resources) had significant effects on emotional exhaustion (β= -0.149, p=0.004; β= 0.223, p<0.001; β= -0.127, p=0.013). Emotional exhaustion predicted by work stressors may act as a chain reaction which could result in uncontrolled eating (β=0.138, p=0.005) and high BMI (β=0.185, p<0.001). Emotional exhaustion does mediate the relationship between PSC and uncontrolled eating behaviour (β= -0.021 [95% boot CI bias corrected: -0.048, -0.002]). CONCLUSION: The psychosocial stressors at work are significant factors for emotional exhaustion, which further signifies the positive effect on uncontrolled eating behaviour and BMI among Malaysian male employees.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85066060665&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85066060665&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 31079128

AN - SCOPUS:85066060665

VL - 74

SP - 160

EP - 167

JO - Medical Journal of Malaysia

JF - Medical Journal of Malaysia

SN - 0300-5283

IS - 2

ER -