Provision of dysphagia services in a developing nation

Infrastructural challenges

Rahayu Mustaffa Kamal, Elizabeth Celeste Ward, Petrea Cornwell, Shobha Sharma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to explore infrastructure issues that may be barriers to the establishment and improvement of dysphagia services in Malaysia compared to settings with established dysphagia management services (i.e. Queensland, Australia).Method: A mixed method design incorporating quantitative and qualitative data was used to increase credibility, validity and comprehensiveness of the results. Thirty-eight hospitals (Malaysia = 21, Queensland = 17) participated in Phase 1 (quantitative component) of the study involving completion of an infrastructure checklist by a speech-language pathologist from each hospital regarding availability of networking and communication, staffing and financial support, facilities and documentation of guidelines for dysphagia management. Subsequently, eight sub-samples from each cohort were then involved in Phase 2 (qualitative component) of the study involving a semi-structured interview on issues related to the impact of infrastructure availability or constraints on service provision.Result: The current study reveals that multiple challenges exist with regard to dysphagia services in Malaysian government hospitals compared to Queensland public hospitals.Conclusion: Overall, it was identified that service improvement in Malaysia requires change at a systems and structures level, but also, more importantly, at the individual/personal level, particularly focusing on the culture, behaviour and attitudes among the staff regarding dysphagia services.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)594-604
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Nov 2015

Fingerprint

Deglutition Disorders
Developing Countries
Queensland
Malaysia
Attitude of Health Personnel
Financial Support
Public Hospitals
Checklist
Reproducibility of Results
Documentation
Language
Communication
Dysphagia
Developing Nations
Guidelines
Interviews

Keywords

  • Developing nation
  • Dysphagia management
  • Infrastructure
  • Service provision
  • Speech-language pathologist

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • LPN and LVN
  • Speech and Hearing
  • Research and Theory
  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

Provision of dysphagia services in a developing nation : Infrastructural challenges. / Mustaffa Kamal, Rahayu; Ward, Elizabeth Celeste; Cornwell, Petrea; Sharma, Shobha.

In: International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Vol. 17, No. 6, 02.11.2015, p. 594-604.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mustaffa Kamal, Rahayu ; Ward, Elizabeth Celeste ; Cornwell, Petrea ; Sharma, Shobha. / Provision of dysphagia services in a developing nation : Infrastructural challenges. In: International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. 2015 ; Vol. 17, No. 6. pp. 594-604.
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