Prospective randomized clinical trial on suction elastic band ligator versus forceps ligator in the treatment of haemorrhoids

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This prospective randomized clinical trial was undertaken to compare the use of a single-operator vacuum suction ligator and the traditional forceps ligator in terms of pain perception following the procedure, intra-procedure bleeding and other complications. Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with second- and third-degree haemorrhoids presenting between July 2002 and September 2003 were randomized into suction and forceps groups for rubber band ligations. They were equally distributed in both groups, with a mean age of 48.7 years (range, 15-83 years). The immediate, 24-hour, 7-day and 14-day pain scores after the procedure were evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Intra-procedure bleeding and other complications at follow-up were evaluated. Results: Pain perception was worse in the forceps group immediately after ligation, with a mean score of 6.08 compared with 3.08 in the suction group (p < 0.001). Pain score remained high among the forceps patients at 24 hours post-banding, with a mean score of 4.00 compared with 1.92 in the suction group (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in terms of immediate and 24-hour pain perceptions whether two or three haemorrhoids were banded per session (p = 0.904 and p = 0.058). The amount of analgesia consumed after banding correlated well with the severity of pain reported, being higher among the forceps group with a mean of 4.48 tablets (p = 0.003). Intra-procedure bleeding occurred in 25 patients in the forceps group compared with five in the suction group (p < 0.001). There were no severe complications such as perianal sepsis, urinary retention, sphincter dysfunction or bleeding during the trial. Conclusion: Suction band ligation is superior to forceps ligation for the treatment of second- and third-degree haemorrhoids in terms of pain tolerance, amount of analgesia consumed and intra-procedure bleeding.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-245
Number of pages5
JournalAsian Journal of Surgery
Volume28
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2005

Fingerprint

Hemorrhoids
Suction
Surgical Instruments
Randomized Controlled Trials
Pain Perception
Ligation
Hemorrhage
Pain
Analgesia
Therapeutics
Urinary Retention
Rubber
Vacuum
Visual Analog Scale
Tablets
Sepsis

Keywords

  • Forceps ligation
  • Haemorrhoid
  • Pain perception
  • Suction band ligation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

@article{a0693001f00a462fbeefc03d371611cf,
title = "Prospective randomized clinical trial on suction elastic band ligator versus forceps ligator in the treatment of haemorrhoids",
abstract = "Objective: This prospective randomized clinical trial was undertaken to compare the use of a single-operator vacuum suction ligator and the traditional forceps ligator in terms of pain perception following the procedure, intra-procedure bleeding and other complications. Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with second- and third-degree haemorrhoids presenting between July 2002 and September 2003 were randomized into suction and forceps groups for rubber band ligations. They were equally distributed in both groups, with a mean age of 48.7 years (range, 15-83 years). The immediate, 24-hour, 7-day and 14-day pain scores after the procedure were evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Intra-procedure bleeding and other complications at follow-up were evaluated. Results: Pain perception was worse in the forceps group immediately after ligation, with a mean score of 6.08 compared with 3.08 in the suction group (p < 0.001). Pain score remained high among the forceps patients at 24 hours post-banding, with a mean score of 4.00 compared with 1.92 in the suction group (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in terms of immediate and 24-hour pain perceptions whether two or three haemorrhoids were banded per session (p = 0.904 and p = 0.058). The amount of analgesia consumed after banding correlated well with the severity of pain reported, being higher among the forceps group with a mean of 4.48 tablets (p = 0.003). Intra-procedure bleeding occurred in 25 patients in the forceps group compared with five in the suction group (p < 0.001). There were no severe complications such as perianal sepsis, urinary retention, sphincter dysfunction or bleeding during the trial. Conclusion: Suction band ligation is superior to forceps ligation for the treatment of second- and third-degree haemorrhoids in terms of pain tolerance, amount of analgesia consumed and intra-procedure bleeding.",
keywords = "Forceps ligation, Haemorrhoid, Pain perception, Suction band ligation",
author = "{Abdul Rahman}, {Mohd Ramzisham} and Ismail Sagap and Sukumar Nadeson and Ali, {Ismail M.} and Ja`Afar, {Mohd Hasni}",
year = "2005",
month = "10",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "241--245",
journal = "Asian Journal of Surgery",
issn = "1015-9584",
publisher = "Elsevier Taiwan LLC",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prospective randomized clinical trial on suction elastic band ligator versus forceps ligator in the treatment of haemorrhoids

AU - Abdul Rahman, Mohd Ramzisham

AU - Sagap, Ismail

AU - Nadeson, Sukumar

AU - Ali, Ismail M.

AU - Ja`Afar, Mohd Hasni

PY - 2005/10

Y1 - 2005/10

N2 - Objective: This prospective randomized clinical trial was undertaken to compare the use of a single-operator vacuum suction ligator and the traditional forceps ligator in terms of pain perception following the procedure, intra-procedure bleeding and other complications. Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with second- and third-degree haemorrhoids presenting between July 2002 and September 2003 were randomized into suction and forceps groups for rubber band ligations. They were equally distributed in both groups, with a mean age of 48.7 years (range, 15-83 years). The immediate, 24-hour, 7-day and 14-day pain scores after the procedure were evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Intra-procedure bleeding and other complications at follow-up were evaluated. Results: Pain perception was worse in the forceps group immediately after ligation, with a mean score of 6.08 compared with 3.08 in the suction group (p < 0.001). Pain score remained high among the forceps patients at 24 hours post-banding, with a mean score of 4.00 compared with 1.92 in the suction group (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in terms of immediate and 24-hour pain perceptions whether two or three haemorrhoids were banded per session (p = 0.904 and p = 0.058). The amount of analgesia consumed after banding correlated well with the severity of pain reported, being higher among the forceps group with a mean of 4.48 tablets (p = 0.003). Intra-procedure bleeding occurred in 25 patients in the forceps group compared with five in the suction group (p < 0.001). There were no severe complications such as perianal sepsis, urinary retention, sphincter dysfunction or bleeding during the trial. Conclusion: Suction band ligation is superior to forceps ligation for the treatment of second- and third-degree haemorrhoids in terms of pain tolerance, amount of analgesia consumed and intra-procedure bleeding.

AB - Objective: This prospective randomized clinical trial was undertaken to compare the use of a single-operator vacuum suction ligator and the traditional forceps ligator in terms of pain perception following the procedure, intra-procedure bleeding and other complications. Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with second- and third-degree haemorrhoids presenting between July 2002 and September 2003 were randomized into suction and forceps groups for rubber band ligations. They were equally distributed in both groups, with a mean age of 48.7 years (range, 15-83 years). The immediate, 24-hour, 7-day and 14-day pain scores after the procedure were evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Intra-procedure bleeding and other complications at follow-up were evaluated. Results: Pain perception was worse in the forceps group immediately after ligation, with a mean score of 6.08 compared with 3.08 in the suction group (p < 0.001). Pain score remained high among the forceps patients at 24 hours post-banding, with a mean score of 4.00 compared with 1.92 in the suction group (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in terms of immediate and 24-hour pain perceptions whether two or three haemorrhoids were banded per session (p = 0.904 and p = 0.058). The amount of analgesia consumed after banding correlated well with the severity of pain reported, being higher among the forceps group with a mean of 4.48 tablets (p = 0.003). Intra-procedure bleeding occurred in 25 patients in the forceps group compared with five in the suction group (p < 0.001). There were no severe complications such as perianal sepsis, urinary retention, sphincter dysfunction or bleeding during the trial. Conclusion: Suction band ligation is superior to forceps ligation for the treatment of second- and third-degree haemorrhoids in terms of pain tolerance, amount of analgesia consumed and intra-procedure bleeding.

KW - Forceps ligation

KW - Haemorrhoid

KW - Pain perception

KW - Suction band ligation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=27744449083&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=27744449083&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 16234072

AN - SCOPUS:27744449083

VL - 28

SP - 241

EP - 245

JO - Asian Journal of Surgery

JF - Asian Journal of Surgery

SN - 1015-9584

IS - 4

ER -