Projected changes of future climate extremes in Malaysia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mitigating and adapting to the impacts of climate change at regional level require downscaled projection of future climate states. This paper examined the possible changes of future climate extremes over Malaysia based on the IPCC SRES A1B emission scenario. The projected changes at 17 stations were produced by bias correcting the UKMO PRECIS downscaling simulation output. The simulation expected higher probability of rainfall extreme occurrences over the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia during the autumn transitional monsoon period. In addition, possible early monsoon rainfall was projected for certain stations located over East Malaysia. The simulation also projected larger increase of warm temperature extremes but smaller decrease of cold extremes, suggesting asymmetric expansion of the temperature distribution. The impact of the elevated green house gases (GHG) is higher in the night time temperature extremes as compared to the day time temperature extremes. The larger increment of warm night frequencies as compared to the warm day suggests smaller diurnal temperature ranges under the influence of higher greenhouse gases. Stations located in East Malaysia were projected to experience the largest increase of warm night occurrence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1051-1058
Number of pages8
JournalSains Malaysiana
Volume42
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2013

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climate
temperature
greenhouse gas
monsoon
simulation
rainfall
downscaling
autumn
climate change
coast
station
distribution
cold

Keywords

  • Bias correction
  • Climate extremes
  • Malaysia
  • PRECIS
  • SRES A1B

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Projected changes of future climate extremes in Malaysia. / Kwan, Meng Sei; Tangang @ Tajudin Mahmud, Fredolin; Liew, Ju Neng.

In: Sains Malaysiana, Vol. 42, No. 8, 08.2013, p. 1051-1058.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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