Principles regarding the use of Haram (Forbidden) sources in food processing: A critical Islamic analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Islam has prepared and outlined clear rules and regulations regarding all types of food, including food from haram sources (forbidden based on the Islamic religion) derived from animals and other bases. This article critically reflects on general Fiqh principles that have been debated by Islamic clerics and renowned experts on Islamic Fiqh regarding this thorny issue. Fiqh scholars, for instance, argue that the halal status of each and every food product could easily be determined by examining how that product was processed from the very beginning. In this sense, if the original source of the product is halal then the final processed product is also deemed halal. Contrarily, if the original source of the product is haram then the final processed product will be considered haram, if the source is dirty, illicit and/or unclean in the eyes of Islam. Even though the final processed product has changed so much in its basic constituents, this product will still be considered haram. Jurists from the Maliki and Hanafi, on the other hand, every item that is considered haram and unclean can be considered halal and fit for consumption or use in the eyes of Islam provided the original item has changed so much from its original make up. That said, jurists from all four sects seem to agree that any new products that can cause detriment and harm to human beings, either directly or otherwise, should be considered impure and haram for consumption and other indirect uses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-25
Number of pages9
JournalAsian Social Science
Volume11
Issue number22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2015

Fingerprint

food
Islam
jurist
Haram
Food Processing
Food processing
sect
animal
Religion
expert
regulation
cause
human being
Food
Fiqh

Keywords

  • Food processing
  • Haram (forbidden)
  • Islamic analysis
  • Principles
  • Regarding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

Cite this

@article{26a96ac2a7fc4c3897f73904a1728977,
title = "Principles regarding the use of Haram (Forbidden) sources in food processing: A critical Islamic analysis",
abstract = "Islam has prepared and outlined clear rules and regulations regarding all types of food, including food from haram sources (forbidden based on the Islamic religion) derived from animals and other bases. This article critically reflects on general Fiqh principles that have been debated by Islamic clerics and renowned experts on Islamic Fiqh regarding this thorny issue. Fiqh scholars, for instance, argue that the halal status of each and every food product could easily be determined by examining how that product was processed from the very beginning. In this sense, if the original source of the product is halal then the final processed product is also deemed halal. Contrarily, if the original source of the product is haram then the final processed product will be considered haram, if the source is dirty, illicit and/or unclean in the eyes of Islam. Even though the final processed product has changed so much in its basic constituents, this product will still be considered haram. Jurists from the Maliki and Hanafi, on the other hand, every item that is considered haram and unclean can be considered halal and fit for consumption or use in the eyes of Islam provided the original item has changed so much from its original make up. That said, jurists from all four sects seem to agree that any new products that can cause detriment and harm to human beings, either directly or otherwise, should be considered impure and haram for consumption and other indirect uses.",
keywords = "Food processing, Haram (forbidden), Islamic analysis, Principles, Regarding",
author = "{Mohd Kashim}, {Mohd Izhar Ariff} and {Abdul Majid}, Latifah and Adnan, {Airil Haimi Mohd} and {Muhammad Husni}, Ahmad and Zaini Nasohah and Samsudin, {Muhammad Adib} and Yahaya, {Mohammad Zaini}",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.5539/ass.v11n22p17",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "17--25",
journal = "Asian Social Science",
issn = "1911-2017",
publisher = "Canadian Center of Science and Education",
number = "22",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Principles regarding the use of Haram (Forbidden) sources in food processing

T2 - A critical Islamic analysis

AU - Mohd Kashim, Mohd Izhar Ariff

AU - Abdul Majid, Latifah

AU - Adnan, Airil Haimi Mohd

AU - Muhammad Husni, Ahmad

AU - Nasohah, Zaini

AU - Samsudin, Muhammad Adib

AU - Yahaya, Mohammad Zaini

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - Islam has prepared and outlined clear rules and regulations regarding all types of food, including food from haram sources (forbidden based on the Islamic religion) derived from animals and other bases. This article critically reflects on general Fiqh principles that have been debated by Islamic clerics and renowned experts on Islamic Fiqh regarding this thorny issue. Fiqh scholars, for instance, argue that the halal status of each and every food product could easily be determined by examining how that product was processed from the very beginning. In this sense, if the original source of the product is halal then the final processed product is also deemed halal. Contrarily, if the original source of the product is haram then the final processed product will be considered haram, if the source is dirty, illicit and/or unclean in the eyes of Islam. Even though the final processed product has changed so much in its basic constituents, this product will still be considered haram. Jurists from the Maliki and Hanafi, on the other hand, every item that is considered haram and unclean can be considered halal and fit for consumption or use in the eyes of Islam provided the original item has changed so much from its original make up. That said, jurists from all four sects seem to agree that any new products that can cause detriment and harm to human beings, either directly or otherwise, should be considered impure and haram for consumption and other indirect uses.

AB - Islam has prepared and outlined clear rules and regulations regarding all types of food, including food from haram sources (forbidden based on the Islamic religion) derived from animals and other bases. This article critically reflects on general Fiqh principles that have been debated by Islamic clerics and renowned experts on Islamic Fiqh regarding this thorny issue. Fiqh scholars, for instance, argue that the halal status of each and every food product could easily be determined by examining how that product was processed from the very beginning. In this sense, if the original source of the product is halal then the final processed product is also deemed halal. Contrarily, if the original source of the product is haram then the final processed product will be considered haram, if the source is dirty, illicit and/or unclean in the eyes of Islam. Even though the final processed product has changed so much in its basic constituents, this product will still be considered haram. Jurists from the Maliki and Hanafi, on the other hand, every item that is considered haram and unclean can be considered halal and fit for consumption or use in the eyes of Islam provided the original item has changed so much from its original make up. That said, jurists from all four sects seem to agree that any new products that can cause detriment and harm to human beings, either directly or otherwise, should be considered impure and haram for consumption and other indirect uses.

KW - Food processing

KW - Haram (forbidden)

KW - Islamic analysis

KW - Principles

KW - Regarding

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84987905123&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84987905123&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5539/ass.v11n22p17

DO - 10.5539/ass.v11n22p17

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84987905123

VL - 11

SP - 17

EP - 25

JO - Asian Social Science

JF - Asian Social Science

SN - 1911-2017

IS - 22

ER -