Prevalence of Needle Stick Injuries and Compliance to Infection Control Guidelines Among Health Care Workers in a Teaching Hospital, Malaysia

M. Z A Hamid, Noorazah Abd Aziz, W. B. Lim, S. L M Salleh, S. N S Rahman, R. Anita, O. Norlijah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Health care workers (HCW) are constantly exposed to blood-borne illnesses through needle stick injuries (NSI). Despite the increasing trend of NSI, evidence regarding the actual practice of universal precautions among these HCWs is lacking. This study assessed the practice of universal precautions towards prevention of NSI among HCWs in a teaching hospital setting. Methods: This cross-sectional survey involved a newly-designed self-completed questionnaire assessing demographic data, exposure to NSI and practice of universal precautions. Questionnaires were distributed to every ward and completed questionnaires were collected after a period of 7 days. Results: A total of 215 HCWs responded to the survey. 35.8% were exposed to bodily fluid, with 22.3% had NSI in the last 12 months. Blood taking was the commonest procedure associated with NSI. Of practices of universal precautions, recapping needle and removing needle from syringe were still wrongly practiced by the HCWs assessed. Conclusion: NSI among HCW are still common despite the introduction of universal precautions in our hospital. Incorrect practices in handling sharps should be looked into in order to reduce the incidence of blood-borne illnesses through NSI in the hospital.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-7
Number of pages5
JournalMalaysian Journal of Medicine and Health Sciences
Volume7
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

Fingerprint

Needlestick Injuries
Malaysia
Infection Control
Teaching Hospitals
Universal Precautions
Guidelines
Delivery of Health Care
Needles
Syringes
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Surveys and Questionnaires
Incidence

Keywords

  • Health care workers
  • Infection control guideline
  • Needle stick injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Prevalence of Needle Stick Injuries and Compliance to Infection Control Guidelines Among Health Care Workers in a Teaching Hospital, Malaysia. / Hamid, M. Z A; Abd Aziz, Noorazah; Lim, W. B.; Salleh, S. L M; Rahman, S. N S; Anita, R.; Norlijah, O.

In: Malaysian Journal of Medicine and Health Sciences, Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 3-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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