Prevalence and distribution of soil-transmitted helminthiases among Orang Asli children living in peripheral Selangor, Malaysia

M. S Hesham Al-Mekhlafi, `Azlin Muhammad @ Mohd Yasin, U. Nor Aini, A. Shaikh, A. Sa'iah, M. S. Fatmah, M. G. Ismail, M. S Ahmad Firdaus, M. Y. Aisah, A. R. Rozlida, Norhayati Moktar

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22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Soil-transmitted helminthiases are a public health problem in rural communities. A cross-sectional study of the prevalence and distribution of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm was conducted in 281 Orang Asli children (aborigines) aged between 2 and 15 years, from 8 Orang Asli villages in Selangor, Malaysia. All the children were infected with soil-transmitted helminthes, with 26.3% of the children infected either with A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura or hookworm and 72.6% having mixed infection. The overall prevalences of A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura and hookworm were 61.9, 98.2 and 37.0%, respectively. Approximately 19.0, 26.0 and 3.0% of the children had severe infection of ascariasis, trichuriasis and hookworm infection, respectively. The prevalences and mean egg per gram (epg) counts for A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura were not significantly dependent on age, therefore age-dependent convexity was not seen in this study. However, the results of this study reveal an age-dependent prevalence and mean epg count in children with hookworm infection. We conclude that ascariasis, trichuriasis and hookworm infection are still prevalent and therefore a public health concern in Orang Asli communities. Severe ascariasis and trichuriasis may lead to other health and medical problems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-47
Number of pages8
JournalSoutheast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health
Volume37
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2006

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Helminthiasis
Malaysia
Ascaris lumbricoides
Trichuris
Trichuriasis
Hookworm Infections
Ascariasis
Soil
Ancylostomatoidea
Ovum
Public Health
Rural Population
Coinfection
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Prevalence and distribution of soil-transmitted helminthiases among Orang Asli children living in peripheral Selangor, Malaysia. / Al-Mekhlafi, M. S Hesham; Muhammad @ Mohd Yasin, `Azlin; Aini, U. Nor; Shaikh, A.; Sa'iah, A.; Fatmah, M. S.; Ismail, M. G.; Firdaus, M. S Ahmad; Aisah, M. Y.; Rozlida, A. R.; Moktar, Norhayati.

In: Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 40-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Al-Mekhlafi, M. S Hesham ; Muhammad @ Mohd Yasin, `Azlin ; Aini, U. Nor ; Shaikh, A. ; Sa'iah, A. ; Fatmah, M. S. ; Ismail, M. G. ; Firdaus, M. S Ahmad ; Aisah, M. Y. ; Rozlida, A. R. ; Moktar, Norhayati. / Prevalence and distribution of soil-transmitted helminthiases among Orang Asli children living in peripheral Selangor, Malaysia. In: Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health. 2006 ; Vol. 37, No. 1. pp. 40-47.
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