Prevalence and characteristics associated with default of treatment and follow-up in patients with cancer

Chan Caryn Mei Hsien, W. A. Wan Ahmad, M. Md Yusof, G. F. Ho, E. Krupat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Defaulting is an important issue across all medical specialties, but much more so in cancer as delayed or incomplete treatment has been shown to result in worse clinical outcomes such as treatment resistance, disease progression as well as lower survival. Our objective was to identify psychosocial variables and characteristics associated with default among cancer patients. A total of 467 consecutive adult cancer patients attending the oncology clinic at a single academic medical centre completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and reported their preference for psychological support at baseline, 4-6 weeks and 12-18 months follow-up. Default was defined as refusal, delay or discontinuation of treatment or visit, despite the ability to do so. A total of 159 of 467 (34.0%) cancer patients were defaulters. Of these 159 defaulters, 89 (56.0%) desired psychological support, compared to only 13 (4.2%) of 308 non-defaulters. Using a logistic regression, patients who were defaulters had 52 times higher odds (P = 0.001; 95% confidence interval 20.61-134.47) of desiring psychological support than non-defaulters after adjusting for covariates. These findings suggest that defaulters should be offered psychological support which may increase cancer treatment acceptance rates and improve survival.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)938-944
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer Care
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Psychology
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Aptitude
Disease Progression
Survival Rate
Anxiety
Logistic Models
Medicine
Confidence Intervals
Depression
Survival

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Desire for support
  • Non-adherence
  • Psychological distress
  • Treatment default

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Prevalence and characteristics associated with default of treatment and follow-up in patients with cancer. / Caryn Mei Hsien, Chan; Wan Ahmad, W. A.; Md Yusof, M.; Ho, G. F.; Krupat, E.

In: European Journal of Cancer Care, Vol. 24, No. 6, 01.11.2015, p. 938-944.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Caryn Mei Hsien, Chan ; Wan Ahmad, W. A. ; Md Yusof, M. ; Ho, G. F. ; Krupat, E. / Prevalence and characteristics associated with default of treatment and follow-up in patients with cancer. In: European Journal of Cancer Care. 2015 ; Vol. 24, No. 6. pp. 938-944.
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