Preposition-related collocation use among british and Malaysian Learners

A corpus analysis

L. H. Ang, Kim Hua Tan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The study examines and compares the use of preposition-related collocations in the writing of Malaysian learners of English and British native speakers of English. The study seeks to answer two research questions: firstly, it sets out to quantify preposition-related collocation use among the Malaysian learners of English and British native speakers of English by measuring the statistical significance of the relevant collocation use in each group using Mutual Information (MI) and a t-score; and secondly, the study aims to identify types of collocational errors associated with prepositions studied in the current research. The frequency-based approach was adopted in the study to define collocations, with the nodeand- collocates analysis employed to identify relevant preposition-related collocations. Two references were used to determine the acceptability or otherwise of the collocations: Google Internet search engine results and the online BNCweb corpus. The data revealed that Malaysian learners of English produce more preposition-related collocations than British native speakers of English do. In terms of collocational errors, a stark contrast in the writing of Malaysian learners of English and that of British native speakers of English is apparent, in which preposition-related collocational errors in the Malaysian learner corpus constitute 1% to 7% for certain prepositions, whereas British native speakers' writing was found to be totally free of collocational errors. .

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-156
Number of pages12
JournalPertanika Journal of Social Science and Humanities
Volume24
Issue numberFebruary
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2016

Fingerprint

search engine
statistical significance
Internet
Prepositions
Corpus Analysis
Collocation
Native Speaker
Group

Keywords

  • Collocational errors
  • Learner corpus
  • Mutual information
  • Node-and-collocates analysis
  • Preposition-related collocations
  • T-score

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Preposition-related collocation use among british and Malaysian Learners : A corpus analysis. / Ang, L. H.; Tan, Kim Hua.

In: Pertanika Journal of Social Science and Humanities, Vol. 24, No. February, 01.02.2016, p. 145-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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