Preliminary study of aspartate aminotransferase activity in gingival crevicular fluids during orthodontic tooth movement

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Abstract

This study investigated the potential of Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) as a biological marker to monitor tooth movement by determining its activity in the Gingival Crevicular Fluid (GCF). Six adolescents and seven adults participated in the study. For each subject, an upper first premolar received tipping force (50-75 g) while the opposing premolar served as control. GCF was collected before force application and weekly for 4 weeks. The activity of AST was determined spectrophotometrically (30°C, 340 nm). AST activity in the GCF of test teeth in all subjects was highest at week 1 and reduced gradually in the next 3 weeks. There was a significant difference in the activity between the test and control teeth in all the subjects throughout the study (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in AST activity between the adult and adolescent subjects (p>0.05). In conclusion, AST appears to have the potential to serve as a biological marker to monitor orthodontic tooth movement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1393-1396
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Applied Sciences
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Gingival Crevicular Fluid
Tooth Movement Techniques
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Bicuspid
Tooth
Biomarkers

Keywords

  • Aspartate aminotransferase
  • Enzymes activity
  • Gingival crevicular fluid
  • Orthodontic
  • Tooth movement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

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title = "Preliminary study of aspartate aminotransferase activity in gingival crevicular fluids during orthodontic tooth movement",
abstract = "This study investigated the potential of Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) as a biological marker to monitor tooth movement by determining its activity in the Gingival Crevicular Fluid (GCF). Six adolescents and seven adults participated in the study. For each subject, an upper first premolar received tipping force (50-75 g) while the opposing premolar served as control. GCF was collected before force application and weekly for 4 weeks. The activity of AST was determined spectrophotometrically (30°C, 340 nm). AST activity in the GCF of test teeth in all subjects was highest at week 1 and reduced gradually in the next 3 weeks. There was a significant difference in the activity between the test and control teeth in all the subjects throughout the study (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in AST activity between the adult and adolescent subjects (p>0.05). In conclusion, AST appears to have the potential to serve as a biological marker to monitor orthodontic tooth movement.",
keywords = "Aspartate aminotransferase, Enzymes activity, Gingival crevicular fluid, Orthodontic, Tooth movement",
author = "{Megat Abdul Wahab}, Rohaya and {Zainal Ariffin}, {Shahrul Hisham} and K. Khazlina",
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T1 - Preliminary study of aspartate aminotransferase activity in gingival crevicular fluids during orthodontic tooth movement

AU - Megat Abdul Wahab, Rohaya

AU - Zainal Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham

AU - Khazlina, K.

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - This study investigated the potential of Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) as a biological marker to monitor tooth movement by determining its activity in the Gingival Crevicular Fluid (GCF). Six adolescents and seven adults participated in the study. For each subject, an upper first premolar received tipping force (50-75 g) while the opposing premolar served as control. GCF was collected before force application and weekly for 4 weeks. The activity of AST was determined spectrophotometrically (30°C, 340 nm). AST activity in the GCF of test teeth in all subjects was highest at week 1 and reduced gradually in the next 3 weeks. There was a significant difference in the activity between the test and control teeth in all the subjects throughout the study (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in AST activity between the adult and adolescent subjects (p>0.05). In conclusion, AST appears to have the potential to serve as a biological marker to monitor orthodontic tooth movement.

AB - This study investigated the potential of Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) as a biological marker to monitor tooth movement by determining its activity in the Gingival Crevicular Fluid (GCF). Six adolescents and seven adults participated in the study. For each subject, an upper first premolar received tipping force (50-75 g) while the opposing premolar served as control. GCF was collected before force application and weekly for 4 weeks. The activity of AST was determined spectrophotometrically (30°C, 340 nm). AST activity in the GCF of test teeth in all subjects was highest at week 1 and reduced gradually in the next 3 weeks. There was a significant difference in the activity between the test and control teeth in all the subjects throughout the study (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in AST activity between the adult and adolescent subjects (p>0.05). In conclusion, AST appears to have the potential to serve as a biological marker to monitor orthodontic tooth movement.

KW - Aspartate aminotransferase

KW - Enzymes activity

KW - Gingival crevicular fluid

KW - Orthodontic

KW - Tooth movement

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