Preferences of Malaysian Cancer Patients in Communication of Bad News

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Breaking bad news to cancer patients is a delicate and challenging task for most doctors. Better understanding of patients' preferences in breaking bad news can guide doctors in performing this task. Objectives: This study aimed to describe the preferences of Malaysian cancer patients regarding the communication of bad news. Methodology: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in the Oncology clinic of a tertiary teaching hospital. Two hundred adult cancer patients were recruited via purposive quota sampling. They were required to complete the Malay language version of the Measure of Patients' Preferences (MPP-BM) with minimal researcher assistance. Their responses were analysed using descriptive statistics. Association between demographic characteristics and domain scores were tested using non-parametric statistical tests. Results: Nine items were rated by the patients as essential: "Doctor is honest about the severity of my condition", "Doctor describing my treatment options in detail", "Doctor telling me best treatment options", Doctor letting me know all of the different treatment options", "Doctor being up to date on research on my type of cancer", "Doctor telling me news directly", "Being given detailed info about results of medical tests", "Being told in person", and "Having doctor offer hope about my condition". All these items had median scores of 5/5 (IQR:4-5). The median scores for the three domains were: "Content and Facilitation" 74/85, "Emotional Support" 23/30 and "Structural and Informational Support" 31/40. Ethnicity was found to be significantly associated with scores for "Content and Facilitation" and "Emotional Support". Educational status was significantly associated with scores for "Structural and Informational Support". Conclusion: Malaysian cancer patients appreciate the ability of the doctor to provide adequate information using good communication skills during the process of breaking bad news. Provision of emotional support, structural support and informational support were also highly appreciated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2749-2752
Number of pages4
JournalAsian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Communication
Patient Preference
Neoplasms
Hope
Educational Status
Aptitude
Tertiary Care Centers
Teaching Hospitals
Language
Therapeutics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Research Personnel
Demography
Research

Keywords

  • Palliative care
  • Patient preference
  • Truth disclosure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

@article{35978a3dcc404fb08a4c7b2d186831c4,
title = "Preferences of Malaysian Cancer Patients in Communication of Bad News",
abstract = "Background: Breaking bad news to cancer patients is a delicate and challenging task for most doctors. Better understanding of patients' preferences in breaking bad news can guide doctors in performing this task. Objectives: This study aimed to describe the preferences of Malaysian cancer patients regarding the communication of bad news. Methodology: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in the Oncology clinic of a tertiary teaching hospital. Two hundred adult cancer patients were recruited via purposive quota sampling. They were required to complete the Malay language version of the Measure of Patients' Preferences (MPP-BM) with minimal researcher assistance. Their responses were analysed using descriptive statistics. Association between demographic characteristics and domain scores were tested using non-parametric statistical tests. Results: Nine items were rated by the patients as essential: {"}Doctor is honest about the severity of my condition{"}, {"}Doctor describing my treatment options in detail{"}, {"}Doctor telling me best treatment options{"}, Doctor letting me know all of the different treatment options{"}, {"}Doctor being up to date on research on my type of cancer{"}, {"}Doctor telling me news directly{"}, {"}Being given detailed info about results of medical tests{"}, {"}Being told in person{"}, and {"}Having doctor offer hope about my condition{"}. All these items had median scores of 5/5 (IQR:4-5). The median scores for the three domains were: {"}Content and Facilitation{"} 74/85, {"}Emotional Support{"} 23/30 and {"}Structural and Informational Support{"} 31/40. Ethnicity was found to be significantly associated with scores for {"}Content and Facilitation{"} and {"}Emotional Support{"}. Educational status was significantly associated with scores for {"}Structural and Informational Support{"}. Conclusion: Malaysian cancer patients appreciate the ability of the doctor to provide adequate information using good communication skills during the process of breaking bad news. Provision of emotional support, structural support and informational support were also highly appreciated.",
keywords = "Palliative care, Patient preference, Truth disclosure",
author = "Tan, {Chai Eng} and Hayati Yaakup and Shah, {Shamsul Azhar} and Aida Jaffar and Khairani Omar",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.7314/APJCP.2012.13.6.2749",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "2749--2752",
journal = "Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention",
issn = "1513-7368",
publisher = "Asian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevention",
number = "6",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Preferences of Malaysian Cancer Patients in Communication of Bad News

AU - Tan, Chai Eng

AU - Yaakup, Hayati

AU - Shah, Shamsul Azhar

AU - Jaffar, Aida

AU - Omar, Khairani

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Background: Breaking bad news to cancer patients is a delicate and challenging task for most doctors. Better understanding of patients' preferences in breaking bad news can guide doctors in performing this task. Objectives: This study aimed to describe the preferences of Malaysian cancer patients regarding the communication of bad news. Methodology: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in the Oncology clinic of a tertiary teaching hospital. Two hundred adult cancer patients were recruited via purposive quota sampling. They were required to complete the Malay language version of the Measure of Patients' Preferences (MPP-BM) with minimal researcher assistance. Their responses were analysed using descriptive statistics. Association between demographic characteristics and domain scores were tested using non-parametric statistical tests. Results: Nine items were rated by the patients as essential: "Doctor is honest about the severity of my condition", "Doctor describing my treatment options in detail", "Doctor telling me best treatment options", Doctor letting me know all of the different treatment options", "Doctor being up to date on research on my type of cancer", "Doctor telling me news directly", "Being given detailed info about results of medical tests", "Being told in person", and "Having doctor offer hope about my condition". All these items had median scores of 5/5 (IQR:4-5). The median scores for the three domains were: "Content and Facilitation" 74/85, "Emotional Support" 23/30 and "Structural and Informational Support" 31/40. Ethnicity was found to be significantly associated with scores for "Content and Facilitation" and "Emotional Support". Educational status was significantly associated with scores for "Structural and Informational Support". Conclusion: Malaysian cancer patients appreciate the ability of the doctor to provide adequate information using good communication skills during the process of breaking bad news. Provision of emotional support, structural support and informational support were also highly appreciated.

AB - Background: Breaking bad news to cancer patients is a delicate and challenging task for most doctors. Better understanding of patients' preferences in breaking bad news can guide doctors in performing this task. Objectives: This study aimed to describe the preferences of Malaysian cancer patients regarding the communication of bad news. Methodology: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in the Oncology clinic of a tertiary teaching hospital. Two hundred adult cancer patients were recruited via purposive quota sampling. They were required to complete the Malay language version of the Measure of Patients' Preferences (MPP-BM) with minimal researcher assistance. Their responses were analysed using descriptive statistics. Association between demographic characteristics and domain scores were tested using non-parametric statistical tests. Results: Nine items were rated by the patients as essential: "Doctor is honest about the severity of my condition", "Doctor describing my treatment options in detail", "Doctor telling me best treatment options", Doctor letting me know all of the different treatment options", "Doctor being up to date on research on my type of cancer", "Doctor telling me news directly", "Being given detailed info about results of medical tests", "Being told in person", and "Having doctor offer hope about my condition". All these items had median scores of 5/5 (IQR:4-5). The median scores for the three domains were: "Content and Facilitation" 74/85, "Emotional Support" 23/30 and "Structural and Informational Support" 31/40. Ethnicity was found to be significantly associated with scores for "Content and Facilitation" and "Emotional Support". Educational status was significantly associated with scores for "Structural and Informational Support". Conclusion: Malaysian cancer patients appreciate the ability of the doctor to provide adequate information using good communication skills during the process of breaking bad news. Provision of emotional support, structural support and informational support were also highly appreciated.

KW - Palliative care

KW - Patient preference

KW - Truth disclosure

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