Preemptive ropivacaine local anaesthetic infiltration versus postoperative ropivacaine wound infiltration in mastectomy

Postoperative pain and drain outputs

M. A I Rica, Norlia Abdullah, Rohaizak Muhammad, I. Naqiyah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate if preemptive local infiltration (PLA) with ropivacaine could improve postoperative pain and determine its effect on drain output postmastectomy with axillary dissection. METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized trial comprising 30 women allocated to two groups: one to receive postoperative wound infiltration (POW) of 20 mL of 0.2% (40 mg) ropivacaine (Naropin®) versus PLA with 20 mL of 0.2% ropivacaine (Naropin®) diluted with 80 mL of 0.9% saline, total volume 100 mL. A visual analogue scale (0-100 mm) and angle of shoulder abduction were used for evaluation of pain. Postoperatively, all patients received oral ibuprofen 400 mg tds. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in postoperative pain for the first 3 days between the two groups. There were wider shoulder abduction angles in the 1st and 3rd postoperative days in the PLA group, but this was not significant. Operative time was significantly shorter in the PLA group than in the POW group (69.34 ± 59.37 minutes vs. 109.67 ± 26.96 minutes; p = 0.02). The axillary drain was removed earlier in the preemptive group, 5.4 ± 1.55 days versus 6.8 ± 2.04 days in the postoperative group (p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: We found no difference in postoperative pain between preemptive tumescent ropivacaine infiltration and postoperative ropivacaine wound infiltration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-39
Number of pages6
JournalAsian Journal of Surgery
Volume30
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2007

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Mastectomy
Postoperative Pain
Local Anesthetics
Wounds and Injuries
Ibuprofen
Operative Time
ropivacaine
Visual Analog Scale
Dissection
Pain

Keywords

  • Drain output
  • Mastectomy
  • Postoperative pain
  • Ropivacaine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

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title = "Preemptive ropivacaine local anaesthetic infiltration versus postoperative ropivacaine wound infiltration in mastectomy: Postoperative pain and drain outputs",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate if preemptive local infiltration (PLA) with ropivacaine could improve postoperative pain and determine its effect on drain output postmastectomy with axillary dissection. METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized trial comprising 30 women allocated to two groups: one to receive postoperative wound infiltration (POW) of 20 mL of 0.2{\%} (40 mg) ropivacaine (Naropin{\circledR}) versus PLA with 20 mL of 0.2{\%} ropivacaine (Naropin{\circledR}) diluted with 80 mL of 0.9{\%} saline, total volume 100 mL. A visual analogue scale (0-100 mm) and angle of shoulder abduction were used for evaluation of pain. Postoperatively, all patients received oral ibuprofen 400 mg tds. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in postoperative pain for the first 3 days between the two groups. There were wider shoulder abduction angles in the 1st and 3rd postoperative days in the PLA group, but this was not significant. Operative time was significantly shorter in the PLA group than in the POW group (69.34 ± 59.37 minutes vs. 109.67 ± 26.96 minutes; p = 0.02). The axillary drain was removed earlier in the preemptive group, 5.4 ± 1.55 days versus 6.8 ± 2.04 days in the postoperative group (p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: We found no difference in postoperative pain between preemptive tumescent ropivacaine infiltration and postoperative ropivacaine wound infiltration.",
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T1 - Preemptive ropivacaine local anaesthetic infiltration versus postoperative ropivacaine wound infiltration in mastectomy

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AU - Abdullah, Norlia

AU - Muhammad, Rohaizak

AU - Naqiyah, I.

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate if preemptive local infiltration (PLA) with ropivacaine could improve postoperative pain and determine its effect on drain output postmastectomy with axillary dissection. METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized trial comprising 30 women allocated to two groups: one to receive postoperative wound infiltration (POW) of 20 mL of 0.2% (40 mg) ropivacaine (Naropin®) versus PLA with 20 mL of 0.2% ropivacaine (Naropin®) diluted with 80 mL of 0.9% saline, total volume 100 mL. A visual analogue scale (0-100 mm) and angle of shoulder abduction were used for evaluation of pain. Postoperatively, all patients received oral ibuprofen 400 mg tds. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in postoperative pain for the first 3 days between the two groups. There were wider shoulder abduction angles in the 1st and 3rd postoperative days in the PLA group, but this was not significant. Operative time was significantly shorter in the PLA group than in the POW group (69.34 ± 59.37 minutes vs. 109.67 ± 26.96 minutes; p = 0.02). The axillary drain was removed earlier in the preemptive group, 5.4 ± 1.55 days versus 6.8 ± 2.04 days in the postoperative group (p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: We found no difference in postoperative pain between preemptive tumescent ropivacaine infiltration and postoperative ropivacaine wound infiltration.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate if preemptive local infiltration (PLA) with ropivacaine could improve postoperative pain and determine its effect on drain output postmastectomy with axillary dissection. METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized trial comprising 30 women allocated to two groups: one to receive postoperative wound infiltration (POW) of 20 mL of 0.2% (40 mg) ropivacaine (Naropin®) versus PLA with 20 mL of 0.2% ropivacaine (Naropin®) diluted with 80 mL of 0.9% saline, total volume 100 mL. A visual analogue scale (0-100 mm) and angle of shoulder abduction were used for evaluation of pain. Postoperatively, all patients received oral ibuprofen 400 mg tds. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in postoperative pain for the first 3 days between the two groups. There were wider shoulder abduction angles in the 1st and 3rd postoperative days in the PLA group, but this was not significant. Operative time was significantly shorter in the PLA group than in the POW group (69.34 ± 59.37 minutes vs. 109.67 ± 26.96 minutes; p = 0.02). The axillary drain was removed earlier in the preemptive group, 5.4 ± 1.55 days versus 6.8 ± 2.04 days in the postoperative group (p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: We found no difference in postoperative pain between preemptive tumescent ropivacaine infiltration and postoperative ropivacaine wound infiltration.

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