Predisposition to obesity in humans

An evolutionary advantage turned deleterious

A. G. Dulloo, C. J K Henry, M. N. Ismail, J. Jacquet, L. Girardier

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There is now substantial evidence indicating that a critical genetic determinant in the propensity to fatness and leanness resides in the way in which the metabolic machinery manages a surplus or a deficit in food intake. From an integrated analysis of past and new data on the pattern of lean and fat tissue deposition or mobilisation during experimental overfeeding, underfeeding and refeeding, this review brings into focus the main determinants of interindividual variability in the regulation of body composition, and discusses their importance in the capacity to adapt to intermittent food availability under conditions of subsistence, and upon their role in susceptibility to obesity in more affluent societies.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)159-168
    Number of pages10
    JournalInternational Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition
    Volume45
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1994

    Fingerprint

    overfeeding
    Thinness
    refeeding
    restricted feeding
    Body Composition
    surpluses
    food availability
    body composition
    food intake
    obesity
    Obesity
    Eating
    Fats
    Food
    lipids
    tissues

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Food Science

    Cite this

    Predisposition to obesity in humans : An evolutionary advantage turned deleterious. / Dulloo, A. G.; Henry, C. J K; Ismail, M. N.; Jacquet, J.; Girardier, L.

    In: International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, Vol. 45, No. 3, 1994, p. 159-168.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Dulloo, A. G. ; Henry, C. J K ; Ismail, M. N. ; Jacquet, J. ; Girardier, L. / Predisposition to obesity in humans : An evolutionary advantage turned deleterious. In: International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition. 1994 ; Vol. 45, No. 3. pp. 159-168.
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