Power asymmetry and nuclear option in india-pakistan security relations

D.Ravichandran K.Dhakshinamoorthy, Hau Khan Sum, Benny Guido

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The India-Pakistan rivalry is an inheritance of past antagonism. Both countries have fought three wars and several bloody conflicts over the possession of Kashmir. This territorial dispute which originated soon after the India-Pakistan partition in 1947, has been a major impediment in their bilateral relations for more than six decades. To address this security dilemma, both countries have acquired nuclear capability to balance each other. This situation has led to arms race and increased hostility in their relations. This article examines how 'nuclear capability' is used in the balance of power between India and Pakistan. It argues that, in an asymmetrical power relations, countries may seek to balance each other through military alliances or by developing nuclear arsenal. The findings suggest an asymmetric power balance between these two countries, favouring the Indian side. The nuclear card, coupled with other security options, has been employed by both countries to gradually balance each other. The nuclear option has also given Pakistan a better bargaining power in its negotiations in managing the Kashmir dispute and other contentious issues with India.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-94
Number of pages15
JournalAsian Journal of Scientific Research
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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asymmetry
Pakistan
India
arms race
bilateral relations
bargaining power
antagonism
balance of power
possession
Military

Keywords

  • Disputes
  • India
  • Pakistan
  • Power asymmetry
  • Security relations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Power asymmetry and nuclear option in india-pakistan security relations. / K.Dhakshinamoorthy, D.Ravichandran; Sum, Hau Khan; Guido, Benny.

In: Asian Journal of Scientific Research, Vol. 8, No. 1, 2015, p. 80-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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