Potential factors that impact the radon level and the prediction of ambient dose equivalent rates of indoor microenvironments

Mohamed Yasreen Mohamed Ali, Marlia Mohd Hanafiah, Firoz Khan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to measure the equilibrium equivalent radon (EECRn) concentration in an old building (Building-1) and a new building (Building-2) with mechanical ventilation and a natural ventilation system, respectively. Both buildings were located at the campus of University Kebangsaan Malaysia. The concentration of indoor radon was measured at 25 sampling stations using a radon detector model DOSEman PRO. The sampling was conducted for 8 h to represent daily working hours. A correlation of the radon concentration was made with the annual inhalation dose of the occupants at the indoor stations. The equilibrium factor and the annual effective dose on the lung cancer risks of each occupant were calculated at each sampling station. The average equilibrium equivalent radon measured in Building-1 and Building-2 was 2.33 ± 0.99 and 3.17 ± 1.74 Bqm−3, respectively. The equilibrium factor for Building 1 ranged from 0.1053 to 0.2273, and it ranged from 0.1031 to 0.16 for Building 2. The average annual inhalation doses recorded at Building-1 and Building-2 were 0.014 ± 0.005 mSv y−1 and 0.020 ± 0.013 mSv y−1, respectively. The annual effective dose for Building-1 was 0.034 ± 0.012 mSv y−1, and it was 0.048 ± 0.031 mSv y−1 for Building-2. The values of equilibrium equivalent radon concentration for both buildings were below the standard recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). However, people may have different radon tolerance levels. Therefore, the inhalation of the radon concentration can pose a deleterious health effect for people in an indoor environment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume626
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2018

Fingerprint

Radon
radon
Dosimetry
prediction
ventilation
Sampling
sampling
indoor radon
rate
equivalent dose
Ventilation
tolerance
Health
Detectors
dose
station

Keywords

  • Annual effective dose
  • Annual inhalation dose
  • Equilibrium factor
  • Human health damage
  • Indoor air pollution
  • Radon concentration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

Cite this

Potential factors that impact the radon level and the prediction of ambient dose equivalent rates of indoor microenvironments. / Ali, Mohamed Yasreen Mohamed; Mohd Hanafiah, Marlia; Khan, Firoz.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 626, 01.06.2018, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "This study aimed to measure the equilibrium equivalent radon (EECRn) concentration in an old building (Building-1) and a new building (Building-2) with mechanical ventilation and a natural ventilation system, respectively. Both buildings were located at the campus of University Kebangsaan Malaysia. The concentration of indoor radon was measured at 25 sampling stations using a radon detector model DOSEman PRO. The sampling was conducted for 8 h to represent daily working hours. A correlation of the radon concentration was made with the annual inhalation dose of the occupants at the indoor stations. The equilibrium factor and the annual effective dose on the lung cancer risks of each occupant were calculated at each sampling station. The average equilibrium equivalent radon measured in Building-1 and Building-2 was 2.33 ± 0.99 and 3.17 ± 1.74 Bqm−3, respectively. The equilibrium factor for Building 1 ranged from 0.1053 to 0.2273, and it ranged from 0.1031 to 0.16 for Building 2. The average annual inhalation doses recorded at Building-1 and Building-2 were 0.014 ± 0.005 mSv y−1 and 0.020 ± 0.013 mSv y−1, respectively. The annual effective dose for Building-1 was 0.034 ± 0.012 mSv y−1, and it was 0.048 ± 0.031 mSv y−1 for Building-2. The values of equilibrium equivalent radon concentration for both buildings were below the standard recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). However, people may have different radon tolerance levels. Therefore, the inhalation of the radon concentration can pose a deleterious health effect for people in an indoor environment.",
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