Postpartum diet quality in Australian women following a gestational diabetes pregnancy

M. K. Morrison, Choon Lian Denise Koh, J. M. Lowe, Y. D. Miller, A. L. Marshall, K. Colyvas, C. E. Collins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Objectives: To describe the diet quality of a national sample of Australian women with a recent history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and determine factors associated with adherence to national dietary recommendations.Subjects/Methods: A postpartum lifestyle survey with 1499 Australian women diagnosed with GDM 3 years previously. Diet quality was measured using the Australian recommended food score (ARFS) and weighted by demographic and diabetes management characteristics. Multinominal logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between diet quality and demographic characteristics, health seeking behaviours and diabetes-related risk factors.Results: Mean (±s.d.) ARFS was 30.9±8.1 from a possible maximum score of 74. Subscale component scores demonstrated that the nuts/legumes, grains and fruits were the most poorly scored. Factors associated with being in the highest compared with the lowest ARFS quintile included age (odds ratio (OR) 5-year increase1.40; 95% (confidence interval) CI: 1.16-1.68), tertiary education (OR2.19; 95% CI: 1.52-3.17), speaking only English (OR1.92; 95% CI: 1.19-3.08), being sufficiently physically active (OR2.11; 95% CI: 1.46-3.05), returning for postpartum blood glucose testing (OR1.75; 95% CI: 1.23-2.50) and receiving risk reduction advice from a health professional (OR1.80; 95% CI: 1.24-2.60).Conclusions: Despite an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, women in this study had an overall poor diet quality as measured by the ARFS. Women with GDM should be targeted for interventions aimed at achieving a postpartum diet consistent with the guidelines for chronic disease prevention. Encouraging women to return for follow-up and providing risk reduction advice may be positive initial steps to improve diet quality, but additional strategies need to be identified.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1160-1165
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume66
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

Fingerprint

Gestational Diabetes
Postpartum Period
Diet
Pregnancy
Food
Risk Reduction Behavior
Demography
Nuts
Health
Fabaceae
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Blood Glucose
Life Style
Fruit
Chronic Disease
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Guidelines
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • diet quality
  • gestational diabetes
  • women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Morrison, M. K., Koh, C. L. D., Lowe, J. M., Miller, Y. D., Marshall, A. L., Colyvas, K., & Collins, C. E. (2012). Postpartum diet quality in Australian women following a gestational diabetes pregnancy. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 66(10), 1160-1165. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2012.84

Postpartum diet quality in Australian women following a gestational diabetes pregnancy. / Morrison, M. K.; Koh, Choon Lian Denise; Lowe, J. M.; Miller, Y. D.; Marshall, A. L.; Colyvas, K.; Collins, C. E.

In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 66, No. 10, 10.2012, p. 1160-1165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morrison, MK, Koh, CLD, Lowe, JM, Miller, YD, Marshall, AL, Colyvas, K & Collins, CE 2012, 'Postpartum diet quality in Australian women following a gestational diabetes pregnancy', European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 66, no. 10, pp. 1160-1165. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2012.84
Morrison, M. K. ; Koh, Choon Lian Denise ; Lowe, J. M. ; Miller, Y. D. ; Marshall, A. L. ; Colyvas, K. ; Collins, C. E. / Postpartum diet quality in Australian women following a gestational diabetes pregnancy. In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2012 ; Vol. 66, No. 10. pp. 1160-1165.
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abstract = "Background/Objectives: To describe the diet quality of a national sample of Australian women with a recent history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and determine factors associated with adherence to national dietary recommendations.Subjects/Methods: A postpartum lifestyle survey with 1499 Australian women diagnosed with GDM 3 years previously. Diet quality was measured using the Australian recommended food score (ARFS) and weighted by demographic and diabetes management characteristics. Multinominal logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between diet quality and demographic characteristics, health seeking behaviours and diabetes-related risk factors.Results: Mean (±s.d.) ARFS was 30.9±8.1 from a possible maximum score of 74. Subscale component scores demonstrated that the nuts/legumes, grains and fruits were the most poorly scored. Factors associated with being in the highest compared with the lowest ARFS quintile included age (odds ratio (OR) 5-year increase1.40; 95{\%} (confidence interval) CI: 1.16-1.68), tertiary education (OR2.19; 95{\%} CI: 1.52-3.17), speaking only English (OR1.92; 95{\%} CI: 1.19-3.08), being sufficiently physically active (OR2.11; 95{\%} CI: 1.46-3.05), returning for postpartum blood glucose testing (OR1.75; 95{\%} CI: 1.23-2.50) and receiving risk reduction advice from a health professional (OR1.80; 95{\%} CI: 1.24-2.60).Conclusions: Despite an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, women in this study had an overall poor diet quality as measured by the ARFS. Women with GDM should be targeted for interventions aimed at achieving a postpartum diet consistent with the guidelines for chronic disease prevention. Encouraging women to return for follow-up and providing risk reduction advice may be positive initial steps to improve diet quality, but additional strategies need to be identified.",
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