Postnatal growth in very low birth weight infants

The Malaysian perspective

Nem Yun Boo, Shareena Ishak

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The incidence of very low birth weight (VLBW, =1500 g) infants in Malaysia was between 10.6 and 14.4 per 1000 live births. About 30% of them were small for gestational age (SGA) at birth. All live born VLBW infants in Malaysia were admitted to the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) after birth. Enteral feeds, with either expressed breast milk (EBM) or preterm formula, and total parenteral nutrition were commenced soon after birth. Oral vitamin supplements for all infants and human milk fortifier for those on EBM were added once the infants were tolerating at least 120 ml/kg per day of oral feeds. Growth of the infants was monitored by regular anthropometric measurement and weekly laboratory blood tests. Oral sodium hydrogen phosphate was commenced in growing infants with biochemical evidence of metabolic bone disease of prematurity. Efforts to reduce metabolic rates in these high-risk infants were instituted over the last decade in many NICUs. These include early and more prolonged use of humidification in the infant incubator to stabilise and maintain the body temperature of these small infants, kangaroo care, and early and more prolonged use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure until all signs of respiratory distress had resolved. In one university hospital, recombinant human erythropoietin was used for prevention of anaemia of prematurity since the year 2001. Despite these efforts, the 10-year data (between 1998 and 2007) of this Malaysian university hospital NICU show that 67.1% (n = 420) of the surviving VLBW infants were SGA at discharge. There was, however, a progressive improvement in average daily weight gain among the VLBW infants admitted to this NICU during the 10-year period.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHandbook of Growth and Growth Monitoring in Health and Disease
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages1545-1560
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781441917959
ISBN (Print)9781441917942
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Very Low Birth Weight Infant
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Growth
Human Milk
Malaysia
Parturition
Infant Incubators
Small for Gestational Age Infant
Macropodidae
Infant Care
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
Total Parenteral Nutrition
Metabolic Bone Diseases
Live Birth
Hematologic Tests
Erythropoietin
Body Temperature
Vitamins
Gestational Age
Small Intestine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Boo, N. Y., & Ishak, S. (2012). Postnatal growth in very low birth weight infants: The Malaysian perspective. In Handbook of Growth and Growth Monitoring in Health and Disease (pp. 1545-1560). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1795-9_91

Postnatal growth in very low birth weight infants : The Malaysian perspective. / Boo, Nem Yun; Ishak, Shareena.

Handbook of Growth and Growth Monitoring in Health and Disease. Springer New York, 2012. p. 1545-1560.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Boo, NY & Ishak, S 2012, Postnatal growth in very low birth weight infants: The Malaysian perspective. in Handbook of Growth and Growth Monitoring in Health and Disease. Springer New York, pp. 1545-1560. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1795-9_91
Boo NY, Ishak S. Postnatal growth in very low birth weight infants: The Malaysian perspective. In Handbook of Growth and Growth Monitoring in Health and Disease. Springer New York. 2012. p. 1545-1560 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1795-9_91
Boo, Nem Yun ; Ishak, Shareena. / Postnatal growth in very low birth weight infants : The Malaysian perspective. Handbook of Growth and Growth Monitoring in Health and Disease. Springer New York, 2012. pp. 1545-1560
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