Post-War Religious Violence, Counter-State Response and Religious Harmony in Sri Lanka

Mohammad Agus Yusoff, Athambawa Sarjoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Sri Lankan military forces and government authorities have succeeded to counter measure terrorism by defeating the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE). However, their initiatives and efforts to restore peace and harmony among different ethno-religious groups in the post-war context are highly complex. The additional space given to the reemergence of radical religious groups has negatively influenced the process of fostering religious tolerance and harmony, which have been maintained for centuries in the country. Ethno-religious minorities became the major targets of religious hatred and violent attacks. At both the societal and political platforms, majoritarian religious sentiments and discourse have established a dominant presence in opposing the existence and practice of the religious fundamentals of minorities. This study has attempted to investigate the nature and impact of majoritarian religious violence in post-war Sri Lanka, as well as the efforts made by the government authorities to control them in order to foster religious tolerance and harmony in the country. This study argues that religious violence under the shadow of religious nationalism has been promoted by many forces as a mechanism by which to consolidate a majoritarian ethno-religious hegemony in the absence of competing ethnic-groups context in post-war Sri Lanka. In many ways, state apparatuses have failed to control religious violence, maintain religious tolerance and inter-religious harmony, particularly of accommodating minorities in nature. The study concludes that the continuous promotion of majoritarian religious hegemony through anti-minority religious hatred and violence would further promote religious intolerance and radicalism challenging the establishment of religious harmony in the country.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)211-223
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Educational and Social Research
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2019

Fingerprint

Sri Lanka
tolerance
violence
religious minority
religious group
hegemony
minority
radicalism
Tamil
liberation
nationalism
terrorism
peace
ethnic group
promotion
Military
discourse

Keywords

  • ethno-religious minorities
  • post-war reconciliation
  • religious harmony
  • religious nationalism
  • Religious violence
  • Sri Lanka

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Post-War Religious Violence, Counter-State Response and Religious Harmony in Sri Lanka. / Yusoff, Mohammad Agus; Sarjoon, Athambawa.

In: Journal of Educational and Social Research, Vol. 9, No. 3, 01.09.2019, p. 211-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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