Popular sites of prayer, transoceanic migration, and cultural diversity: Exploring the significance of keramat in Southeast Asia

Sumit K. Mandal

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This chapter explores keramat, or the venerated graves of notable figures, as a location of socially and culturally diverse practices in the history of Muslim Southeast Asia (also referred to as the ‘Malay world’ here). While these sites comprise the graves of people of a variety of ethnic backgrounds, histories, and faiths, they are usually associated with Muslims, and frequently with Hadramis. In the course of studying Hadrami migrations to Java, I was struck by the observations of keramat made by the colonial scholar-bureaucrats C. Snouck Hurgronje and L. W. C. van den Berg. Both men noted the high stature of the keramat of a Hadrami scholar in Luar Batang, Batavia (present-day Jakarta, Indonesia), as well as the multi-ethnic following it had in the late nineteenth century. In this chapter, I revisit keramat with the hope of gaining further insight into the dynamics of cultural and social diversity in the modern history of Muslim Southeast Asia. This chapter draws together two areas of interest to me. The first is the significance of ubiquitous popular shrines—often intimately tied to the land—to the contemporary societies of Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. The second is the study of Hadramis and Islam in Southeast Asia. The latter is a long-standing area of research for me and hence a subject that I approach with some surefootedness. The former is a more recent interest about which my knowledge is still at a formative stage.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationSites of Asian Interaction: Ideas, Networks and Mobility
    PublisherCambridge University Press
    Pages127-143
    Number of pages17
    ISBN (Print)9781139979474, 9781107082083
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2013

    Fingerprint

    South-East Asia
    Prayer
    Cultural Diversity
    Muslims
    History
    Indonesia
    Islam
    Singapore
    Java
    Multiethnic
    Modern History
    Faith
    Colonies
    Malaysia

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Arts and Humanities(all)

    Cite this

    Mandal, S. K. (2013). Popular sites of prayer, transoceanic migration, and cultural diversity: Exploring the significance of keramat in Southeast Asia. In Sites of Asian Interaction: Ideas, Networks and Mobility (pp. 127-143). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139979474.008

    Popular sites of prayer, transoceanic migration, and cultural diversity : Exploring the significance of keramat in Southeast Asia. / Mandal, Sumit K.

    Sites of Asian Interaction: Ideas, Networks and Mobility. Cambridge University Press, 2013. p. 127-143.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Mandal, SK 2013, Popular sites of prayer, transoceanic migration, and cultural diversity: Exploring the significance of keramat in Southeast Asia. in Sites of Asian Interaction: Ideas, Networks and Mobility. Cambridge University Press, pp. 127-143. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139979474.008
    Mandal SK. Popular sites of prayer, transoceanic migration, and cultural diversity: Exploring the significance of keramat in Southeast Asia. In Sites of Asian Interaction: Ideas, Networks and Mobility. Cambridge University Press. 2013. p. 127-143 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139979474.008
    Mandal, Sumit K. / Popular sites of prayer, transoceanic migration, and cultural diversity : Exploring the significance of keramat in Southeast Asia. Sites of Asian Interaction: Ideas, Networks and Mobility. Cambridge University Press, 2013. pp. 127-143
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