Polystyrene-benzoylated EFB reinforced composites

Sarani Zakaria, Lee Kok Poh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reinforced thermoplastics generally are produced by incorporation of reinforcement agents or fillers into thermoplastic resins. The utilization of lignocellulosic material as filler with reinforcement in polymer matrix has received much interest due to its lower price and other properties. A composite of polystyrene reinforced with oil palm empty bunches (EFB) and chemically treated EFB with benzoyl chloride (EFB-benzoylated) as a function of loading and fiber surface modification were prepared. The chemically treated fibers were analyzed with FT-IR to observe the extent of chemical reaction with EFB fiber. The sharp peak at 710 cm-1 appeared on the spectra, which indicated that the mono-substituted benzene ring has taken place. The strong peak at 1720 cm-1 has indicated the presence of ester group treated fiber. The flexural test was performed using Instron 4301 testing machine to study flexural properties of the composites with various fiber sizes. The results showed that the flexural properties increased with particle size. The flexural strength of EFB-benzoylated composites was observed to be stronger than untreated EFB fiber. Scanning electron microscope was used to investigate the morphological structure of the fiber surface, fiber pull out, fracture surface, and fiber-matrix interface. The untreated EFB composites showed hole and fiber end, which indicated that most of the fiber have pulled out breaking during the fracture of composites; however, the treated EFB-benzoylated showed a good adhesion between fiber and matrix.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)951-962
Number of pages12
JournalPolymer - Plastics Technology and Engineering
Volume41
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2002

Fingerprint

Polystyrenes
Fibers
Composite materials
Thermoplastics
Fillers
Reinforcement
Palm oil
Benzene
Polymer matrix
Bending strength
Surface treatment
Chemical reactions
Esters
Electron microscopes
Adhesion
Particle size

Keywords

  • Benzoylated
  • Chemical modification
  • Matrix interaction
  • Wood plastic composites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Materials Science (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Polystyrene-benzoylated EFB reinforced composites. / Zakaria, Sarani; Poh, Lee Kok.

In: Polymer - Plastics Technology and Engineering, Vol. 41, No. 5, 11.2002, p. 951-962.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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