Plasma polymerized carvone as an antibacterial and biocompatible coating

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10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antibacterial coating is important to prevent the colonization of medical devices by biofilm forming bacteria that would cause infection and sepsis in patients. Current coating techniques such as immobilization of antimicrobial compounds, time-releasing antibiotic agents and silver nanoparticles, require multiple processing steps, and they have low efficacy and low stability. We proposed a single-step plasma polymerization of an essential oil known as carvone to produce a moderately hydrophobic antibacterial coating (ppCar) with an average roughness of < 1 nm. ppCar had a static water contact angle of 78°, even after 10 days of air aging and it maintained its stability throughout 24 h of LB broth immersion. ppCar showed promising results in the live-dead fluorescence assay and crystal violet assay. The biofilm assay showed an effective reduction of E. coli and S. aureus bacteria by 86% and 84% respectively. ppCar is also shown to rupture the bacteria membrane for its bactericidal effects. The cytotoxicity test indicated that the coating is not cytotoxic to the human cell line. This study would be of interest to researcher keen on producing a bacteria-resistance and biocompatible coating on different substrates in a cost-effective manner.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)861-871
Number of pages11
JournalMaterials Science and Engineering C
Volume68
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2016

Fingerprint

bacteria
Bacteria
Plasmas
coatings
Assays
Coatings
biofilms
Biofilms
broths
Gentian Violet
Plasma polymerization
Essential oils
Coating techniques
antibiotics
releasing
infectious diseases
Antibiotics
Volatile Oils
Cytotoxicity
immobilization

Keywords

  • Antibacterial coating
  • Bacterial infections
  • Biofilm
  • Cytotoxicity
  • Plasma polymerization
  • Roughness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "Antibacterial coating is important to prevent the colonization of medical devices by biofilm forming bacteria that would cause infection and sepsis in patients. Current coating techniques such as immobilization of antimicrobial compounds, time-releasing antibiotic agents and silver nanoparticles, require multiple processing steps, and they have low efficacy and low stability. We proposed a single-step plasma polymerization of an essential oil known as carvone to produce a moderately hydrophobic antibacterial coating (ppCar) with an average roughness of < 1 nm. ppCar had a static water contact angle of 78°, even after 10 days of air aging and it maintained its stability throughout 24 h of LB broth immersion. ppCar showed promising results in the live-dead fluorescence assay and crystal violet assay. The biofilm assay showed an effective reduction of E. coli and S. aureus bacteria by 86{\%} and 84{\%} respectively. ppCar is also shown to rupture the bacteria membrane for its bactericidal effects. The cytotoxicity test indicated that the coating is not cytotoxic to the human cell line. This study would be of interest to researcher keen on producing a bacteria-resistance and biocompatible coating on different substrates in a cost-effective manner.",
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AU - Siow, Kim Shyong

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AU - Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

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AB - Antibacterial coating is important to prevent the colonization of medical devices by biofilm forming bacteria that would cause infection and sepsis in patients. Current coating techniques such as immobilization of antimicrobial compounds, time-releasing antibiotic agents and silver nanoparticles, require multiple processing steps, and they have low efficacy and low stability. We proposed a single-step plasma polymerization of an essential oil known as carvone to produce a moderately hydrophobic antibacterial coating (ppCar) with an average roughness of < 1 nm. ppCar had a static water contact angle of 78°, even after 10 days of air aging and it maintained its stability throughout 24 h of LB broth immersion. ppCar showed promising results in the live-dead fluorescence assay and crystal violet assay. The biofilm assay showed an effective reduction of E. coli and S. aureus bacteria by 86% and 84% respectively. ppCar is also shown to rupture the bacteria membrane for its bactericidal effects. The cytotoxicity test indicated that the coating is not cytotoxic to the human cell line. This study would be of interest to researcher keen on producing a bacteria-resistance and biocompatible coating on different substrates in a cost-effective manner.

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