Pickup of essential kinematics underpins expert perception of movement patterns

Bruce Abernethy, Mohd Khairi Zawi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

131 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a series of 3 experiments, the authors examined the ability of badminton players of different skill levels (12 experts and 12 nonexperts) to anticipate the direction of badminton strokes. Participants viewed either film or point-light displays under a range of temporal or spatial occlusion conditions. World-class players were able to consistently pick up useful predictive information from the advance (precontact) kinematics of both the lower body and the racquet when the motion of those features was presented in isolation, whereas recreational players' use of the same information depended on the concurrent presence of linked segments. Participants' information pickup closely matched key biomechanical changes in the movement pattern being viewed, although, contrary to a common-coding view of perception and action (e.g., W. Prinz, 1997), some important differences were evident between the characteristics of the experts' movement prediction and those of expert movement production.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-367
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Motor Behavior
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Racquet Sports
Biomechanical Phenomena
Aptitude
Stroke
Light

Keywords

  • Expertise
  • Kinematics
  • Perception
  • Skill learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Pickup of essential kinematics underpins expert perception of movement patterns. / Abernethy, Bruce; Zawi, Mohd Khairi.

In: Journal of Motor Behavior, Vol. 39, No. 5, 09.2007, p. 353-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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