Phytotoxicity test of Scirpus grossus on diesel-contaminated water using a subsurface flow system

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A phytotoxicity experiment with diesel as a model hydrocarbon pollutant at different concentrations (0, 8700, 17,400 and 26,100. mg/L) was performed on the emergent wetland bulrush of Scirpus grossus in a subsurface flow system (SSF). After 72 days of exposure, maximum removal occurred at the diesel concentration of 17,400. mg/L at 91.5%; in the corresponding control without plants, the removal was only 54.1%. Furthermore, the removal efficiency of hydrocarbons from sand was determined to be in the range of 67.2-69.9% for all treatments. According to the plant growth parameters, it was shown that S. grossus could effectively promote the degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) when the concentration of diesel in water was up to17,400. mg/L. The population of living microorganisms in the planted aquariums could also adapt to ≤17,400. mg/L diesel contaminated water. This study showed that S. grossus and rhizobacteria in a subsurface flow system has potential in reclaiming hydrocarbon-contaminated water.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-56
Number of pages8
JournalEcological Engineering
Volume54
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2013

Fingerprint

phytotoxicity
subsurface flow
diesel
Hydrocarbons
hydrocarbon
Water
water
Wetlands
petroleum hydrocarbon
aquarium
rhizobacterium
Microorganisms
Sand
Crude oil
microorganism
wetland
Degradation
degradation
sand
test

Keywords

  • Hydrocarbon
  • Phytotoxicity
  • Scirpus grosuss
  • Sub-surface flow system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

@article{96f7d5c8e3fd4ac0aaa3a460f7fb0ec9,
title = "Phytotoxicity test of Scirpus grossus on diesel-contaminated water using a subsurface flow system",
abstract = "A phytotoxicity experiment with diesel as a model hydrocarbon pollutant at different concentrations (0, 8700, 17,400 and 26,100. mg/L) was performed on the emergent wetland bulrush of Scirpus grossus in a subsurface flow system (SSF). After 72 days of exposure, maximum removal occurred at the diesel concentration of 17,400. mg/L at 91.5{\%}; in the corresponding control without plants, the removal was only 54.1{\%}. Furthermore, the removal efficiency of hydrocarbons from sand was determined to be in the range of 67.2-69.9{\%} for all treatments. According to the plant growth parameters, it was shown that S. grossus could effectively promote the degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) when the concentration of diesel in water was up to17,400. mg/L. The population of living microorganisms in the planted aquariums could also adapt to ≤17,400. mg/L diesel contaminated water. This study showed that S. grossus and rhizobacteria in a subsurface flow system has potential in reclaiming hydrocarbon-contaminated water.",
keywords = "Hydrocarbon, Phytotoxicity, Scirpus grosuss, Sub-surface flow system",
author = "Al-Baldawi, {Israa Abdulwahab} and Abdullah, {Siti Rozaimah Sheikh} and Fatihah Suja' and Nurina Anuar and Mushrifah Idris",
year = "2013",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.ecoleng.2013.01.016",
language = "English",
volume = "54",
pages = "49--56",
journal = "Ecological Engineering",
issn = "0925-8574",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Phytotoxicity test of Scirpus grossus on diesel-contaminated water using a subsurface flow system

AU - Al-Baldawi, Israa Abdulwahab

AU - Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah Sheikh

AU - Suja', Fatihah

AU - Anuar, Nurina

AU - Idris, Mushrifah

PY - 2013/5

Y1 - 2013/5

N2 - A phytotoxicity experiment with diesel as a model hydrocarbon pollutant at different concentrations (0, 8700, 17,400 and 26,100. mg/L) was performed on the emergent wetland bulrush of Scirpus grossus in a subsurface flow system (SSF). After 72 days of exposure, maximum removal occurred at the diesel concentration of 17,400. mg/L at 91.5%; in the corresponding control without plants, the removal was only 54.1%. Furthermore, the removal efficiency of hydrocarbons from sand was determined to be in the range of 67.2-69.9% for all treatments. According to the plant growth parameters, it was shown that S. grossus could effectively promote the degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) when the concentration of diesel in water was up to17,400. mg/L. The population of living microorganisms in the planted aquariums could also adapt to ≤17,400. mg/L diesel contaminated water. This study showed that S. grossus and rhizobacteria in a subsurface flow system has potential in reclaiming hydrocarbon-contaminated water.

AB - A phytotoxicity experiment with diesel as a model hydrocarbon pollutant at different concentrations (0, 8700, 17,400 and 26,100. mg/L) was performed on the emergent wetland bulrush of Scirpus grossus in a subsurface flow system (SSF). After 72 days of exposure, maximum removal occurred at the diesel concentration of 17,400. mg/L at 91.5%; in the corresponding control without plants, the removal was only 54.1%. Furthermore, the removal efficiency of hydrocarbons from sand was determined to be in the range of 67.2-69.9% for all treatments. According to the plant growth parameters, it was shown that S. grossus could effectively promote the degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) when the concentration of diesel in water was up to17,400. mg/L. The population of living microorganisms in the planted aquariums could also adapt to ≤17,400. mg/L diesel contaminated water. This study showed that S. grossus and rhizobacteria in a subsurface flow system has potential in reclaiming hydrocarbon-contaminated water.

KW - Hydrocarbon

KW - Phytotoxicity

KW - Scirpus grosuss

KW - Sub-surface flow system

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84874376658&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84874376658&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2013.01.016

DO - 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2013.01.016

M3 - Article

VL - 54

SP - 49

EP - 56

JO - Ecological Engineering

JF - Ecological Engineering

SN - 0925-8574

ER -