Physicochemical factors and sources of particulate matter at residential urban environment in Kuala Lumpur

Firoz Khan, Mohd Talib Latif, Ju Neng Liew, Norhaniza Amil, Mohd Shahrul Mohd Nadzir, Hossain Mohammed Syedul Hoque

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-term measurements (2004–2011) of PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter 3], nitrogen oxide [NO], oxides of nitrogen [NOx], nitrogen dioxide [NO2], sulfur dioxide [SO2], methane [CH4], nonmethane hydrocarbon [NMHC]) have been conducted to study the effect of physicochemical factors on the PM10 concentration. In addition, this study includes source apportionment of PM10 in Kuala Lumpur urban environment. An advanced principal component analysis (PCA) technique coupled with absolute principal component scores (APCS) and multiple linear regression (MLR) has been applied. The average annual concentration of PM10 for 8 yr is 51.3 ± 25.8 μg m−3, which exceeds the Recommended Malaysian Air Quality Guideline (RMAQG) and international guideline values. Detail analysis shows the dependency of PM10 on the linear changes of the motor vehicles in use and the amount of biomass burning, particularly from Sumatra, Indonesia, during southwesterly monsoon. The main sources of PM10 identified by PCA-APCS-MLR are traffic combustion (28%), ozone coupled with meteorological factors (20%), and windblown particles (1%). However, the apportionment procedure left 28.0 μg m−3, that is, 51% of PM10undetermined. Implications: Air quality is always a top concern around the globe. Especially in the South Asian regions, measures are not yet sufficient; as revealed in our studies, the concentrations of particulate matters exceed the tolerable limits. Long-term data analysis and characterization of particular matters and their sources will aid the policy makers and the concerned authority to adapt measures and policies according to the circumstances. Additionally, similar intensive studies will give insight about future implications of air quality management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)958-969
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the Air and Waste Management Association
Volume65
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Particulate Matter
particulate matter
principal component analysis
air quality
Indonesia
Air
Principal Component Analysis
nonmethane hydrocarbon
Linear Models
nitrogen dioxide
nitrogen oxides
biomass burning
Meteorological Concepts
sulfur dioxide
Guidelines
Nitrogen Oxides
aerodynamics
Nitrogen Dioxide
Sulfur Dioxide
monsoon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Physicochemical factors and sources of particulate matter at residential urban environment in Kuala Lumpur. / Khan, Firoz; Latif, Mohd Talib; Liew, Ju Neng; Amil, Norhaniza; Mohd Nadzir, Mohd Shahrul; Hoque, Hossain Mohammed Syedul.

In: Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association, Vol. 65, No. 8, 2015, p. 958-969.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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