Phylogenetic analyses uncover a novel clade of transferrin in nonmammalian vertebrates

Hirzahida Mohd-Padil, Adura Mohd-Adnan, Toni Gabaldón

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Transferrin is a protein super-family involved in iron transport, a central process in cellular homeostasis. Throughout the evolution of vertebrates, transferrin members have diversified into distinct subfamilies including serotransferrin, ovotransferrin, lactoferrin, melanotransferrin, the inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase, pacifastin, and the major yolk protein in sea urchin. Previous phylogenetic analyses have established the branching order of the diverse transferrin subfamilies but were mostly focused on the transferrin repertoire present in mammals. Here, we conduct a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of transferrin protein sequences in sequenced vertebrates, placing a special focus on the less-studied nonmammalian vertebrates. Our analyses uncover a novel transferrin clade present across fish, sauropsid, and amphibian genomes but strikingly absent from mammals. Our reconstructed scenario implies that this novel class emerged through a duplication event at the vertebrate ancestor, and that it was subsequently lost in the lineage leading to mammals. We detect footprints of accelerated evolution following the duplication event, which suggest positive selection and early functional divergence of this novel clade. Interestingly, the loss of this novel class of transferrin in mammals coincided with the divergence by duplication of lactoferrin and serotransferrin in this lineage. Altogether, our results provide novel insights on the evolution of iron-binding proteins in the various vertebrate groups.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)894-905
    Number of pages12
    JournalMolecular Biology and Evolution
    Volume30
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

    Fingerprint

    transferrin
    Transferrin
    Vertebrates
    vertebrate
    vertebrates
    phylogenetics
    mammal
    phylogeny
    protein
    Mammals
    mammals
    divergence
    Lactoferrin
    lactoferrin
    iron
    homeostasis
    ancestry
    footprint
    amphibian
    inhibitor

    Keywords

    • functional divergence
    • Lates calcarifer
    • phylogenetics
    • positive selection
    • transferrin

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Genetics
    • Molecular Biology
    • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

    Cite this

    Phylogenetic analyses uncover a novel clade of transferrin in nonmammalian vertebrates. / Mohd-Padil, Hirzahida; Mohd-Adnan, Adura; Gabaldón, Toni.

    In: Molecular Biology and Evolution, Vol. 30, No. 4, 04.2013, p. 894-905.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Mohd-Padil, Hirzahida ; Mohd-Adnan, Adura ; Gabaldón, Toni. / Phylogenetic analyses uncover a novel clade of transferrin in nonmammalian vertebrates. In: Molecular Biology and Evolution. 2013 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 894-905.
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