Pharmacist-patient communication on use of antidepressants: A simulated patient study in community pharmacy

Wei Wen Chong, Parisa Aslani, Timothy F. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Effective communication between community pharmacists and patients, particularly with a patient-centered approach, is important to address patients' concerns relating to antidepressant medication use. However, few studies have investigated community pharmacists' communication behaviors in depression care. Objective: To characterize community pharmacist-patient interactions during consultations involving use of antidepressants. Methods: Twenty community pharmacists received 3 simulated patient visits involving issues related to the use of antidepressants: 1) patient receiving a first-time antidepressant prescription; 2) patient perceiving lack of efficacy of antidepressants after 2 weeks of treatment, and 3) patient intending to discontinue treatment prematurely. All 60 encounters were audio-recorded and analyzed using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS), a quantitative coding system that characterizes communication behaviors through discrete categories. A patient-centeredness score was calculated for each encounter. Results: The majority of pharmacist communication was biomedical in nature (50.7%), and focused on providing therapeutic information and advice on the antidepressant regimen. In contrast, only 5.4% of pharmacist communication was related to lifestyle/psychosocial exchanges. There were also few instances of emotional rapport-building behaviors (8.6%) or information gathering (6.6%). Patient-centered scores were highest in the scenario involving a first-time antidepressant user, as compared to other scenarios involving issues with continued therapy. Conclusions: Community pharmacists appeared to adopt a "medication-centered" approach when counseling on antidepressant issues. There is scope for improvement in patient-centered communication behaviors, particularly lifestyle/psychosocial discussions, facilitating patient participation, and emotional rapport-building. The RIAS appears suited to characterize brief consultations in community pharmacies and can provide a framework in guiding communication training efforts. Further research is needed to assess the impact of pharmacist communication behaviors on patient care outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-437
Number of pages19
JournalResearch in Social and Administrative Pharmacy
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Pharmacies
Pharmacists
Antidepressive Agents
Communication
Life Style
Referral and Consultation
Patient Participation
Therapeutics
Prescriptions
Counseling
Patient Care
Depression

Keywords

  • Antidepressant adherence
  • Patient-centeredness
  • Pharmacist-patient communication
  • Roter Interaction Analysis System

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Pharmacist-patient communication on use of antidepressants : A simulated patient study in community pharmacy. / Chong, Wei Wen; Aslani, Parisa; Chen, Timothy F.

In: Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, Vol. 10, No. 2, 03.2014, p. 419-437.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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