Perspectives on the Nutritional Management of Renal Disease in Asia: People, Practice, and Programs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The high prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in many Asian countries is attributed to diabetes and hypertension. Health care expenditure in relation to per capita income and government share of this expenditure vary among Asian countries and are affected by large populations and the poverty factor. The impact of ESRD on nutritional management in Asia reveals the need for clinicians to balance the requirements for higher standards of dietetic practice as they implement optimal care algorithms with the goal of improving outcomes, against the backdrop of staffing limitations, limited expertise in renal nutrition practice, and cultural diversity among Asian people. This paper discusses current aspects of dietetic practice and the likelihood that a change in practice is required if dietitians are to play an active role in preventing or slowing down ESRD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-96
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Renal Nutrition
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2007

Fingerprint

Disease Management
kidney diseases
Chronic Kidney Failure
Dietetics
dietetics
Health Expenditures
Kidney
multicultural diversity
Cultural Diversity
Nutritionists
dietitians
Poverty
poverty
health services
hypertension
diabetes
kidneys
nutrition
Hypertension
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Urology
  • Food Science
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Perspectives on the Nutritional Management of Renal Disease in Asia : People, Practice, and Programs. / Karupaiah, Tilakavati; Morad, Z.

In: Journal of Renal Nutrition, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.2007, p. 93-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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