Personal data protection in employment: New legal challenges for Malaysia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to discuss and apply data protection principles in the context of employment. The Personal Data Protection Act (PDPA), passed by the Malaysian Parliament in 2010, has affected many aspects of life in Malaysia, including employment. Storage of data by employers is rampant. Management, as the data user, is duty bound to safeguard the employees' data according to the PDPA. Likewise, the employees, as data subjects, enjoy some rights under the PDPA. The author also examines issues of privacy law: whether such law exists in Malaysia and, if so, whether it can be reconciled with the PDPA's principles. The author adopts legal methodology anchored in exploratory analysis, with the legislative text as the main reference point.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)696-703
Number of pages8
JournalComputer Law and Security Review
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

data protection
personal data
Data privacy
Malaysia
act
employee
privacy law
parliament
employer
Personnel
Law
Data protection
Personal data
methodology
management
Employees

Keywords

  • Data protection
  • Employees
  • Employment
  • Malaysian law
  • Privacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Law

Cite this

Personal data protection in employment : New legal challenges for Malaysia. / Hassan, Kamal Halili.

In: Computer Law and Security Review, Vol. 28, No. 6, 12.2012, p. 696-703.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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