Performance optimisation of PEM fuel cell during MEA fabrication

Wan Ramli Wan Daud, Abu Bakar Mohamad, Abdul Amir H. Kadhum, Rachid Chebbi, Sunny E. Iyuke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have analysed membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) involving fabricated and commercially available electrodes using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and developed simple mathematical models to simulate the best performance and design conditions. The analysis showed that a MEA surface with the catalyst layer consisting of 10 wt% Pt/C and 30 wt% Teflon® (PTFE, designated E2) loaded with 0.38 mg Pt/cm2 showed good localisation of the platinum particles. The SEM image of the E2 electrode showed the existence of a diffusion layer, while the cross-section of electrode E3 (without diffusion layer) showed only the backing layer of the carbon cloth. It was seen that good adhesion of the catalyst on the membrane was obtained as a result of the hot press used in fabrication. XPS analysis showed that the electrode surfaces consisted of C, O, F, Si and Pt, whose binding energies for the PTFE/C layer were C1s, O1s, F1s and Si2p states and were 285.0, 532.7, 689.5 and 103.0 eV, respectively. While for the catalyst layer, the binding energies for the elements, C1s, O1s, F1s, Si2p and Pt4f states, were 284.3, 532.4, 689.3, 102.9 and 74.1 eV, respectively. Similar observations were made for a commercial E-TEK electrode. The mathematical and simulation investigations supported the hypothesis made in an earlier study in terms of optimum PEM fuel cell performance determination and design simulation. The calculated values of the voltage operational limit Voplcal. agreed quite well with the experimental data Voplexp. reported earlier. Other works from the open literature were also correlated using the mathematical model, and it was found that the Vopl values were comparable. Hydrogen usage thus calculated was best with the E2 electrode compared to E1, E3 and the commercially available E-TEK electrode.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3239-3249
Number of pages11
JournalEnergy Conversion and Management
Volume45
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2004

Fingerprint

Cell membranes
Fuel cells
Fabrication
Electrodes
Polytetrafluoroethylenes
Binding energy
Membranes
Catalysts
Electron microscopes
X ray photoelectron spectroscopy
Mathematical models
Scanning
Chemical elements
Platinum
Adhesion
Hydrogen
Carbon
Electric potential

Keywords

  • Design and simulation
  • Fuel cell
  • Hydrogen usage
  • MEA
  • Optimisation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Fuel Technology
  • Nuclear Energy and Engineering
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment

Cite this

Performance optimisation of PEM fuel cell during MEA fabrication. / Wan Daud, Wan Ramli; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Chebbi, Rachid; Iyuke, Sunny E.

In: Energy Conversion and Management, Vol. 45, No. 20, 12.2004, p. 3239-3249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wan Daud, Wan Ramli ; Mohamad, Abu Bakar ; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H. ; Chebbi, Rachid ; Iyuke, Sunny E. / Performance optimisation of PEM fuel cell during MEA fabrication. In: Energy Conversion and Management. 2004 ; Vol. 45, No. 20. pp. 3239-3249.
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